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anonymous

  • one year ago

When a 3-kg iron skillet is heated on the stove, it becomes hot very quickly. When 3 kg of water is heated on the stove it heats up slowly. What is the reason for this difference? Support your answer using 3 – 4 complete sentences.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Michele_Laino

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @KyanTheDoodle

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @cramos725

  4. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    let's suppose to heat the same mass of water and iron, namely M=3 Kg of iron and M=3 kg of water Let's suppose furthermore, that the temperature difference is the same, say \[\Delta \theta \]

  5. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    then the quantity of heat absobed by iron is: \[\Delta {Q_{IRON}} = {c_{IRON}}M\Delta \theta \]

  6. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    where the quantity of heat absorbed by water is: \[\Delta {Q_{WATER}} = {c_{WATER}}M\Delta \theta \]

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    None of that makes sense to me

  8. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    now we can consider the specific heat of a substance: \[\Large c = \frac{1}{M}\frac{{\Delta Q}}{{\Delta \theta }}\] as a heating rate with respect to the temperature difference

  9. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    empirically we can say that the subsequent condition holds: \[\Large \Delta {Q_{IRON}} > \Delta {Q_{WATER}}\] from which, we get: \[\Large {c_{IRON}} > {c_{WATER}}\]

  10. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    and keeping in mind the meaning of c as heating rate, we get your answer

  11. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    another reasoning is: the mobility of electrons inside the iron (please think about the Fermi sea) is greater than the mobility of the molecule of water, so the heat will transmit itself more rapidly in iron than in water

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