anonymous
  • anonymous
The diagram below shows the proper orientation of two reactants in order for a successful collision to occur. Use this model to explain why some collisions are not successful by describing the other ways these two reactants can collide. Draw additional images to illustrate.
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I understand the molecular collision theory, but I'm not fond of this image. It's really throwing me for a loop and making it hard to answer the question.
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
|dw:1434262039012:dw| In this diagram though the collision take place the contact between the reactant is too low as result it may not be the successful collision to result a new product similarly u can draw other images in what other way both can A and B collide
anonymous
  • anonymous
@chmvijay Okay, that definitely helps. Thank you! Like I said, I understand that molecules must collide with proper orientation and with sufficient energy, but that diagram was really odd in my opinion.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

chmvijay
  • chmvijay
yaa you are right ! that diagram is really odd !
anonymous
  • anonymous
@chmvijay If it's okay with you, can I ask you one more question?
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
yes please do
anonymous
  • anonymous
The Ka of phenol, HOC6H5, is 1.6 × 10-10. Explain, in terms of the equilibrium constant, the chemical equation for the reaction, the equilibrium expression, and the predominant species at equilibrium.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not really sure how to approach this question. If that's all the information I'm given, how would I derive the chemical equation, the equilibrium constant, etc. ?
sweetburger
  • sweetburger
The dominant species at equilibrium is going to HOC6H15 and this is due to the extremely small Ka value associated with it
sweetburger
  • sweetburger
Also to derive the chemical equation basically its phenol reacting with H2O for the most part
sweetburger
  • sweetburger
Just because the Ka of substances is usually experimentally determined in water solutions
anonymous
  • anonymous
That would make sense. Thanks!
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
hope you could fin it easily thanks @sweetburger
sweetburger
  • sweetburger
Ka relates to the Dissociation of water in the sense that Kw=Ka + Kb this allows you to find the Kb of the conjugate base if i remember correctly aswel
sweetburger
  • sweetburger
i got to check to make sure thats not false info on that last item though one second
sweetburger
  • sweetburger
Ya that equation does allow u to find the dissociation of the conjugate base. All good hope this helped.
anonymous
  • anonymous
It really did. Much appreciated.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.