A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

rvc

  • one year ago

How do you study physics? The different types of problems we have in physics are so confusing sometimes. How to tackle them? Any suggestions please.....

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    physics is mostly like a theory. if you forget about probs for a moment. you will see a story a perfectly well arranged/furnished story which was written by a lot of people. and its seansons have no ending. and in some situations we do take help of other sitcoms like maths/ bilology/history just to make some iteration on the stated concept. its quite simply called as proofing. and we usually call it "science" so, before going to probs or the theory validation.. just go through the story behind it. ex:: a bus travelling with a speed of 70 mph, with an acceleration of 0.5x per 30 min. how much time it will take for it to travel 200 kilometers.. and now thats a "no idea" question... first you need to know the concepts.. speed,acceleration, time,distance. then you can easily figure it out... trust me..

  2. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I usually study Physics using the kantian metaphysics, so a good advice can be this: you have to establish the cause and its corresponding effect, for each phenomenon described into your exercise.

  3. theEric
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm not the best at physics, unfortunately. So, take anything I say with a grain of salt. Have an open mind - there are many ways to think about the same thing, and it's great to see the same thing in as many ways as possible. Know that a lot of physics is based on logic that accurately describes what we see. They're a little separate. For anyone who has had a teacher use a projector with a transparent sheet that they draw on, physics is like that. We are looking at nature, and drawing over it what we think happens so that we can understand it. On the other hand, physics also works with things that it doesn't even pretend to understand. Physics can look at what nature does, and describe it as accurately as possible. That's because we're humans, not know-it-alls. As you're learning, realize that you're learning what we know, as fallible humans. Around the 1900's, I think, everyone was driving themselves crazy trying to understand a theory that involved an "ether" that permeated all space. Well, we now consider that theory unproductive an obsolete. We've found other ways to understand it. This represents the first two points well, I think. If you want to go to high level physics, my advice is to practice math! Math describes physics more generally and succinctly than any way I know of. Teachers use mathematical techniques a lot, so that's important.

  4. rvc
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    haha luminiferous ether right @theEric Thank you so much @theEric @Michele_Laino @harishk

  5. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    :)

  6. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.