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tywower

  • one year ago

Which of the following is a possible set of quantum numbers for an electron? (1, 1, 0, +½) (1, 0, 0, +½) (3, 2, 3, -½) (3, -1, 0, -½)

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  1. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus

  2. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @ganeshie8

  3. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @Australopithecus

  4. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @perl

  5. tywower
    • one year ago
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    HIII UNCLE RHAUKUS

  6. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    HI !

  7. tywower
    • one year ago
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    *UNKLE

  8. tywower
    • one year ago
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    i'm kinda lost on this question :(

  9. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    lets look at the QM numbers one at a time

  10. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    the first one is n ; the principal QM, it represent the electron shell n has to be some positive natural number

  11. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    all the n's in the options are valid

  12. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    the second QN , \(\ell\); is the subshell this can be values from 0 up n-1

  13. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    this makes of two of the options invalid, can you tell me which two?

  14. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    Yes the options have the second term: either not greater than 0, or not less than n so they can't be right

  15. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    we have these options left: (1, 0, 0, +½) (3, 2, 3, -½)

  16. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    the third quantum number is the magnetic quantum number, \(m_\ell\) this can be any integer less than or equal in magnitude to \(\ell\) _____ for example if \(n\) was 5 and \(ell\) was 4, \(m_{\ell}\) could be -4, -3, -2, -1, 0 , 1, 2, 3, or 4

  17. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    \(ell\)*\(\ell\)

  18. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    The final quantum number is related to the spin of the electron, \(m_s\) this can only take values of: \(+\tfrac12\) or \(-\tfrac12\)

  19. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    Only one of the options has both: the second QN less than the first (but non-negative), and the third QN less than or equal to (in magnitude) the second

  20. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    Which option is this @tywower?

  21. tywower
    • one year ago
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    the third one

  22. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    nope, the third option has the third QN greater than (in magnitude) the second QN

  23. tywower
    • one year ago
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    can u explain why it's the second one :)

  24. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    A. (1, 1, 0, +½) not this one, \(\ell\not<n\) (1, 0, 0, +½) maybe (3, 2, 3, -½) not this one, \(|m_\ell|\not\leq \ell\) (3, -1, 0, -½) not this one either, \(\ell\not>0\)

  25. tywower
    • one year ago
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    thank you so much @UnkleRhaukus u are absolutley amazing! can u help me with some more?

  26. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    more Q numbers?

  27. tywower
    • one year ago
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    No, they're just questions I'm having a hard time understanding :)

  28. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    ok,

  29. tywower
    • one year ago
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    Such as: Which of the following pairs of elements could possibly be found in the same group on the periodic table? A is an alkali metal, B forms a 1- ion. A has the atomic number 20, B forms a 2- ion. A is a noble gas, B has seven valence electrons. A forms a -3 ion, B has five valence electrons.

  30. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    What kind of ions do metals form? + or - ?

  31. tywower
    • one year ago
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    +

  32. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    so could the first option possibly be true?

  33. tywower
    • one year ago
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    maybe

  34. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    elements in a group (column) always form the same kind of ions e.g. Mg^+, Ca^+, are ions of group II, F^-, Cl^-, Br^-, are ions of group VII

  35. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    If A and B are of the same group, and A (a metal) forms ^+ ions, could B form ^- ions?

  36. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    @tywower

  37. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus

  38. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus

  39. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    @tywower

  40. tywower
    • one year ago
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    sorry i got distracted

  41. tywower
    • one year ago
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    lol

  42. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    @tywower

  43. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus it's the last one right

  44. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    perhaps

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