tywower
  • tywower
Which of the following is a possible set of quantum numbers for an electron? (1, 1, 0, +½) (1, 0, 0, +½) (3, 2, 3, -½) (3, -1, 0, -½)
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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tywower
  • tywower
@UnkleRhaukus
tywower
  • tywower
@ganeshie8
tywower
  • tywower
@Australopithecus

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More answers

tywower
  • tywower
@perl
tywower
  • tywower
HIII UNCLE RHAUKUS
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
HI !
tywower
  • tywower
*UNKLE
tywower
  • tywower
i'm kinda lost on this question :(
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
lets look at the QM numbers one at a time
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
the first one is n ; the principal QM, it represent the electron shell n has to be some positive natural number
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
all the n's in the options are valid
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
the second QN , \(\ell\); is the subshell this can be values from 0 up n-1
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
this makes of two of the options invalid, can you tell me which two?
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
Yes the options have the second term: either not greater than 0, or not less than n so they can't be right
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
we have these options left: (1, 0, 0, +½) (3, 2, 3, -½)
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
the third quantum number is the magnetic quantum number, \(m_\ell\) this can be any integer less than or equal in magnitude to \(\ell\) _____ for example if \(n\) was 5 and \(ell\) was 4, \(m_{\ell}\) could be -4, -3, -2, -1, 0 , 1, 2, 3, or 4
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
\(ell\)*\(\ell\)
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
The final quantum number is related to the spin of the electron, \(m_s\) this can only take values of: \(+\tfrac12\) or \(-\tfrac12\)
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
Only one of the options has both: the second QN less than the first (but non-negative), and the third QN less than or equal to (in magnitude) the second
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
Which option is this @tywower?
tywower
  • tywower
the third one
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
nope, the third option has the third QN greater than (in magnitude) the second QN
tywower
  • tywower
can u explain why it's the second one :)
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
A. (1, 1, 0, +½) not this one, \(\ell\not0\)
tywower
  • tywower
thank you so much @UnkleRhaukus u are absolutley amazing! can u help me with some more?
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
more Q numbers?
tywower
  • tywower
No, they're just questions I'm having a hard time understanding :)
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
ok,
tywower
  • tywower
Such as: Which of the following pairs of elements could possibly be found in the same group on the periodic table? A is an alkali metal, B forms a 1- ion. A has the atomic number 20, B forms a 2- ion. A is a noble gas, B has seven valence electrons. A forms a -3 ion, B has five valence electrons.
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
What kind of ions do metals form? + or - ?
tywower
  • tywower
+
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
so could the first option possibly be true?
tywower
  • tywower
maybe
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
elements in a group (column) always form the same kind of ions e.g. Mg^+, Ca^+, are ions of group II, F^-, Cl^-, Br^-, are ions of group VII
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
If A and B are of the same group, and A (a metal) forms ^+ ions, could B form ^- ions?
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
@tywower
tywower
  • tywower
@UnkleRhaukus
tywower
  • tywower
@UnkleRhaukus
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
@tywower
tywower
  • tywower
sorry i got distracted
tywower
  • tywower
lol
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
@tywower
tywower
  • tywower
@UnkleRhaukus it's the last one right
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
perhaps

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