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Loser66

  • one year ago

Starting with 2 sets A and B of respective cardinalities a and b, use all operations on sets that you have learnt: 1) to construct sets whose cardinalities are the following 2) to construct word-problems whose solutions require counting the numbers of the sets you first constructed a) (b+a)(b-a) b) b^{a+b} Please, help.

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  1. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    I don't know how to start.

  2. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    @mathmate

  3. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123

  4. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    @loser66 Can we start with a list of the operations you've learned?

  5. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    yes, sir

  6. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Whatever you use, I am ok.

  7. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    sorry @Loser66 i haven't a clue about this kind of stuff :(

  8. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    If you're vague about this, then I assume you know at least union, intersection, difference, and complement, right?

  9. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    It's ok, friend, neither I.

  10. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    yes

  11. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    Do you know how to find |A\(\cap\)B| in terms of A and B, using the above operators?

  12. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    yes, I do. But first off, I need you to define what are set A and B, please

  13. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Since the problem has 2 parts, operation and word problem. We can go backward by defining the sets first and then work on it, right?

  14. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    The same as in your question, i.e. with cardinalities a and b. But we don't use them for now. Is that ok?

  15. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    Actually, I was planning to use a+b = |A|+|B|=|A\(\cap\)B|+|A\(\cup\)B|, and similarly a-b, but then it's not a set, which is what the question asks. Perhaps @ganeshie8 has a better idea.

  16. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434458366736:dw|

  17. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    I have to go for work now. I will be back after work. If you have any idea, please guide me. I will take it later. Much appreciate.

  18. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Well never mind...

  19. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Are the sets disjoint?

  20. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Hold on, I'll post a pic of my work.

  21. freckles
    • one year ago
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    @Kainui or @mukushla Question about sets maybe you might be able to help with.

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