A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

MEDAL + FAN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • This Question is Open
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 Attachment
  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @igreen

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @mathstudent55

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @mathmate

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @is3535

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ...

  7. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Do you know the slope-intercept form of the equation of a line? \(y = mx + b\)

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes i recognize that

  9. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    That is above the figure you provided. The b part is where the line crosses the y-axis. That is called the y-intercept. Look in the given graph. At what point on the y-axis does the line cross the y-axis?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    110

  11. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Great. We no have that b = 110, and we have this much: \(y = mx + 110\) Now we need to find m, the slope.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok

  13. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    To find the slope, you can use two points of the line. Pick two points that are easy to read on your graph. That means, pick two points that are on intersections of the grid lines. Can you read two points?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes i can

  15. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    One point can be the one that includes y = 110.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (10,110) ?

  17. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Close. It's (0, 110). Since it's on the y-axis, the x-coordinate is 0. (0, 110) is a good point. Now we need another one.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    see i was going to say 0 but i thought it wouldn't count since 0 is the orgin

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but it makes since since (0,110) = 110

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    my next one is (10,90)

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    also i just realized that 10,110 is not on the line anyway , lal

  22. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    You get to the point we are talking about, (0, 110), by starting at the origin. You go 0 right or left. That is why the x-coordinate is 0. Then you go 110 up. That makes the y-coordinate 110. The point is (0, 110) That means start at the origin, go 0 right or left (you're still at the origin), then go up 110. You end up at the point 110 on the y-axis.

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    exactly ^

  24. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Yes, (10, 90) is a good point because it's easy to read since it falls on the grid lines. Another easy point would be (20, 70). Ok, let's use (0, 110) and (10, 90)

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok now whet?

  26. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    We need to find the slope of the line that has those two points. The way to find the slope is subtract the two y-coordinates. Then subtract the two x-coordinates. Divide the first difference by the second difference.

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    like x^1 - x^2 y^1 - y^2

  28. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    |dw:1434398858240:dw|

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oops i was backwords

  30. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    The order does not matter, as long as you do both subtractions int he same order.

  31. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    |dw:1434399014025:dw|

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    -20/10 is what i got

  33. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Now we need to do the subtractions in the numerator and denominator.

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1434399153286:dw|

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1434399177385:dw|

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1434399221808:dw|

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    am i correct? @mathstudent55

  38. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    |dw:1434399234449:dw|

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    :D

  40. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    You have a fraction. A fraction means division.

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i know but i thought you said subtract

  42. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    |dw:1434399290651:dw|

  43. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1434399386993:dw|

  44. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    You subtract the y's and you subtract the x's. Then you divide one subtraction by the other one.

  45. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Yes. The slope is -2. That goes in the m of the slope-intercept equation.

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    y=-2x+110 :D

  47. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Correct.

  48. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Notice that if we used the points in the other order, the slope would still be the same:

  49. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    |dw:1434399447815:dw|

  50. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    OK i would just like to say thank you very much for your time here, you have helped me far beyond me expectations, there for, i shall fan you in hope that i may be able to ask for your assistance again c;

  51. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    When you use two points to find the slope, it makes no difference which point you use first and which point you use second for the y- and x-coordinate subtractions. The important thing is to do both subtractions in the same order.

  52. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I have another problem like this and i will message you if i need help on it, thank you and good day sir

  53. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    You are very welcome. Thanks for paying attention. You did a great job! Feel free to ask me for help anytime. It's just that now I gtg.

  54. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.