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Anikate

  • one year ago

Please help: http://prntscr.com/7hgmps

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Use process of elimination. Do you have any ideas?

  2. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    nope @mastermindkakashi

  3. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    what do isotopes have to do with protons??

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    isotopes of an element are the same but weigh differently according to the number of neutrons. since thallium-205 weighs more than thallium-203 (since 205>203) there cannot be fewer protons, that would lead to a completely different element (since atomic number is the number of protons)

  5. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    hmm ok..... so its D

  6. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    the fourth option

  7. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    can u plz help me with this, idk how I got it wrong: http://prntscr.com/7hgpba

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the atomic mass unit is an average of the thallium isotope number and how abundant it is in nature. Since the amu is closer to 205 than 203, you can infer that there is more thallium-205. The number has nothing to do with weight.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the answer to number 6 is the second option because thallium always has an atomic number of 81 and the atomic number is equal to the number of protons, which is why you got number 9 wrong.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The atomic number of an element never changes because it represents the number pf protons. If you change the number of protons, you have a completely different element. As previously stated.

  11. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    do protons always stay the same? @mastermindkakashi

  12. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    @Ehsan18

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes always the same

  14. Ehsan18
    • one year ago
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    its B

  15. Ehsan18
    • one year ago
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    @mastermindkakashi is right!

  16. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    can u please help me with studying for a final? i have a lot of questions @Ehsan18

  17. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    @mastermindkakashi

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I can try my best

  19. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    sweet! thanks!

  20. Ehsan18
    • one year ago
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    Me to will try my best but having my exams too!!

  21. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    plz help me with both quesionts on this, i dont understand it http://prntscr.com/7hh7nw

  22. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    guys?

  23. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    @Ehsan18 do u know this?

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay so on the periodic table, the higher up you go and the farther to the right is the most electronegative

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have to go, so just tag me with your questions and I can get back to you later. Sorry

  26. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    ok, and how about 13? @Ehsan18 @mastermindkakashi

  27. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    @Ehsan18

  28. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    @rosiejd are you good with ionic compunds? do u know the basics?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no, sorry,havent taken the subject in years and i forgot.

  30. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    ok

  31. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    http://prntscr.com/7hhft0 @Lokid

  32. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    plz help

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh woah that one is new doe, what is the lewis structures

  34. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    https://dr282zn36sxxg.cloudfront.net/datastreams/f-d%3A3d4059a9ff59983ace0a329d34ef6d3ffb36a17fe950586fcb8f3db0%2BIMAGE%2BIMAGE.1 lewis dot structures just show the sharing of valence electrons @Lokid

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay ya sorry i wish i could help but that looks way more advanced than what i did DX so so sorry wish i could help

  36. Anikate
    • one year ago
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    np thanks doe @Lokid

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    =D

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