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Jravenv

  • one year ago

Help me please screencap in comments. best answer rewarded

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  1. Jravenv
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1. simplify square roots to simplify the expression more: \[((\sqrt{25}*\sqrt{3a})+(\sqrt{4}*\sqrt{3a})-(\sqrt{9}*\sqrt{3a}))/3a\]

  3. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    Probably gonna get banned for saying this, but every time I read your question, I see "best answer retarded"

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2. Next solve the square roots: \[((5*\sqrt{3a})+(2*\sqrt{3a})-(3*\sqrt{3a})/\sqrt{3a}\]

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Note: first step denominator should be square root 3a 3. the numerator has like terms so: \[(5+2-3)(\sqrt{3a})/(\sqrt{3a})\rightarrow 5+2-3\rightarrow 4\]

  6. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    as I mentioned plenty times before...there are different methods to solving the problem in Mathematics as long as it doesn't break the Math rules.

  7. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    but.. @hughfuve your answer isn't in the choices given... so something is wrong.

  8. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    because ... (I hope I still remember this right) when you're changing to exponent form \[\sqrt{3a} \rightarrow (3a)^{\frac{1}{2}}\]

  9. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    you're distributing that 1/2 all over

  10. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    Ok. I know what's going on.. we need a \[\sqrt{3a}\] in the numerator so we can cancel out the \[\sqrt{3a}\] denominator

  11. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    so we need to split up 75, 27, and 12

  12. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{\sqrt{75a}+\sqrt{12a}-\sqrt{27a}}{\sqrt{3a}}\]

  13. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    ok this is going to work :) we want that denominator to leave but before we have that we need to split up 75, 12, and 27.. we need perfect square numbers

  14. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    is @Jravenv here right now? I want to guide her through this process we need to know what perfect squares can we use so we can take the square root so what is 3 x ? = 75, 3 x ? = 12, and 3 x ? = 27? there are 3 perfect square numbers

  15. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    another way is what's 75/3, 12/4 , and 27/3 ???

  16. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    sorry 75/3, 12/3, and 27/3

  17. Jravenv
    • one year ago
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    114/3

  18. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    this is separate what is 75/3 or 3 x ? = 75

  19. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    we're not adding those three fractions.. we are using division for 75/3 =? 12/3 =? 27/3 = ?

  20. Jravenv
    • one year ago
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    25

  21. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    yes! so what about 12/3 = ? and 27/3 = ?

  22. Jravenv
    • one year ago
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    4 and 8 and a 3rd

  23. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    what is 12 divided by 3? what is 27 divided by 3?

  24. Jravenv
    • one year ago
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    4 and 9

  25. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{\sqrt{25 \cdot 3 a}+\sqrt{4 \cdot 3a}-\sqrt{9 \cdot 3 a}}{\sqrt{3a}}\]

  26. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    so all we need is the square root of 25, 4, and 9 what is the square root of 25? what is the square root of 4? what is the square root of 9?

  27. Jravenv
    • one year ago
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    5 2 and 3?

  28. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    yes.

  29. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{5\sqrt{ 3 a}+2\sqrt{ 3a}-3\sqrt{ 3 a}}{\sqrt{3a}}\]

  30. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    now we noticed that there is a term in common and I want to factor it out because i want to get rid of the denominator.. so what can we pull out of the numerator?

  31. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    each term in the numerator has it, so it's safe to factor out :)

  32. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    I can't factor 5 2 and 3 out, but I can factor _____________?

  33. Jravenv
    • one year ago
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    3a

  34. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{\sqrt{ 3 a}(5+2-3)}{\sqrt{3a}}\] yes notice that now we can get rid of the square root ?

  35. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    we're left with a very simple equation... using order of operations PEMDAS... well just AS...we just add and subtract.

  36. Jravenv
    • one year ago
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    So its 4

  37. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    yes it's 4. 5+2-3 using order of operations..addition first 5+2 = 7 7-3 (subtraction) 7-3 = 4

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    geeez I completely forgot how to do that.. you are quite the doll usuki.

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