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anonymous

  • one year ago

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  1. kanwal32
    • one year ago
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    (2/3)^n-1

  2. kanwal32
    • one year ago
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    to infinite or 4

  3. kanwal32
    • one year ago
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    no i am asking till where we have to find infinite or 4

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @kanwal32

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you mean this?

  6. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    yes, thats what he is asking. But do u understand the solution given in the old post? u can simply substitute 3/2 by 2/3 to get ur ans...

  7. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    there is a formula given in the old post on how to calculate the sum....did u see it?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I did, but it's pretty confusing, could you start me out?

  9. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    u need to understand the 3 terms used in the formula: a, R and n a is the initial term in the series so in this case, it is equal to \[(\frac{ 2 }{ 3})^{1-1} \] =1 ok?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay.

  11. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    R is the common ratio...so what is the ratio between the first and second term in this series? Basically what u get if u divide the second term by the first term? u already know the first term, a, is 1...

  12. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    nope, first term is 1....what is the second term - when n=2....

  13. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434612184951:dw|

  14. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    no, ignore the part that I scribbled out...whatever is left, substitute n=2 and what will u get?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think it is 3

  16. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    \[(\frac{ 2 }{ 3 })^{(2-1)}\] = 2/3 So that is R in the formula ok?

  17. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    n is simple and equal to 4 in this case. So for the formula in the last post, use the following: a=1 R=(2/3) n=4 to calculate the sum. Good luck!

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    (2/3) (2 - 1) is 2/3. now what? @sdfgsdfgs

  19. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    What is the formula to get the sum from the old post?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh okay..

  21. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    a=1 R=2/3 n=4 Calculate S which is ur ans.

  22. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    Put in the values we found for a, R and n....

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    where would a go?

  24. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    It IS a simple question but I think u have skipped ur study material related to the geometric series. Otherwise u should not have so much trouble :(

  25. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    not funny :( sorry it is late...I need to go soon. put the values into the last line here: http://assets.openstudy.com/updates/attachments/4fb88e44e4b05565342dc675-kelly_01-1337495416339-geometric_sequence_17.gif

  26. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    sorry to hear about ur health problem but u really need to understand the geometric series first before u can solve problems like this....

  27. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    Correct! It is \[S = \frac{ (1-(\frac{ 2 }{ 3 })^4 )}{ 1-\frac{ 2 }{ 3 } }\]

  28. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    We work it out this time because u found the old post. But you should read up geometric series before taking on more problems like this one.

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im right there and i kind of understand it a bit now..

  30. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    try it again - 65/16 is not the right ans.

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay one sec..

  32. sdfgsdfgs
    • one year ago
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    sorry i need to go now....65/27 is the right ans. good luck!

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