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  • one year ago

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    how would that helpme? there is nothing about algebra there @whoperman28

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sort of..

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay and what is n

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay, so now what do we do

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wait where did the 5 come from?

  6. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    The formula for the sum of a finite Arithmetic series is \[S_n = \frac n2(s_0+s_n)\] where \(s_1\) is the first term, \(s_n\) is the last term, and \(m\) is the number of terms

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    now what?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    someone please its 2am im so tireddd

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    omg please help wolf my back is killing me i never want to see this laptop ever again

  11. wolf1728
    • one year ago
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    Okay here it is explained a little easier. The sum of consecutive integers from 1 to 100 would be n*(n+1) /2 = 100 * 101 /2 = 5,050 Let's suppose you have to sum 11 to 100? We know 1 to 100 = 5,050 So, to sum 11 to 100 we would have to subtract sum of 1 to 10 10 * 11 /2= 110 / 2 =55 SO, sum of 11to 100 equals 5,050 MINUS 55 = 4,995

  12. wolf1728
    • one year ago
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    SO, you have to sum 5 through 11 using the formula? sum of 1 to 11 = 11 * 12 / 2 = 66 sum of 1 to 4 = 4 *5/2 = 10 66 - 10 = 56

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @wolf1728 so is that the entire anser? and that is simple lol??

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @wolf1728 ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

  15. wolf1728
    • one year ago
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    Yes that is it. As you probably know you could just as easily add up 5+ 6+ 7+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11 using pencil and paper but I guess they just want you to get familiar with formulas.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    lol wow. okay thnk you

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