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tywower

  • one year ago

Which of the following best explains why vapor pressure is affected by adding solute to a solvent? --Adding solute to the solvent increases the volume of solution therefore reducing the amount of space in a sealed container. --Adding solute reduces the amount of surface area available for the solvent molecules to evaporate. --Adding solute increases both the molality and the molecular weight of the solution. --Adding solute disrupts the intermolecular forces between the solvent molecules. --Adding solute disrupts the intermolecular forces between the solvent molecules.

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  1. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @aaronq

  2. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @Callisto

  3. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @quickstudent

  4. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @dan815

  5. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @MelodicSymphony

  6. tywower
    • one year ago
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    can u help me

  7. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @aaronq

  8. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @dan815!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! MY HERO!

  9. tywower
    • one year ago
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    wassup dan! u lookin' fresh as always

  10. dan815
    • one year ago
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    lol

  11. tywower
    • one year ago
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    u have any ideas on this

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I want to say its the first one

  13. tywower
    • one year ago
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    hmm ok, @dan815 what do u thiink?

  14. tywower
    • one year ago
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    i was thinking about the first one but im still not sure

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    "When a nonvolatile solute is added to a liquid to form a solution, the vapor pressure above that solution decreases. To understand why that might occur, let's analyze the vaporization process of the pure solvent then do the same for a solution. Liquid molecules at the surface of a liquid can escape to the gas phase when they have a sufficient amount of energy to break free of the liquid's intermolecular forces. That vaporization process is reversible. Gaseous molecules coming into contact with the surface of a liquid can be trapped by intermolecular forces in the liquid. Eventually the rate of escape will equal the rate of capture to establish a constant, equilibrium vapor pressure above the pure liquid. If we add a nonvolatile solute to that liquid, the amount of surface area available for the escaping solvent molecules is reduced because some of that area is occupied by solute particles. Therefore, the solvent molecules will have a lower probability to escape the solution than the pure solvent. That fact is reflected in the lower vapor pressure for a solution relative to the pure solvent. That statement is only true if the solvent is nonvolatile. If the solute has its own vapor pressure, then the vapor pressure of the solution may be greater than the vapor pressure of the solvent. Note that we did not need to identify the nature of the solvent or the solute (except for its lack of volatility) to derive that the vapor pressure should be lower for a solution relative to the pure solvent. That is what makes vapor pressure lowering a colligative property--it only depends on the number of dissolved solute particles. summarizes our discussion so far. On the surface of the pure solvent (shown on the left) there are more solvent molecules at the surface than in the right-hand solution flask. Therefore, it is more likely that solvent molecules escape into the gas phase on the left than on the right. Therefore, the solution should have a lower vapor pressure than the pure solvent. " -Sparknotes

  16. tywower
    • one year ago
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    so A?

  17. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @aaronq

  18. tywower
    • one year ago
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    @quickstudent

  19. tywower
    • one year ago
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    it was wrong sir

  20. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    --Adding solute reduces the amount of surface area available for the solvent molecules to evaporate. is always true but, --Adding solute disrupts the intermolecular forces between the solvent molecules. can also happen depending on the solute interacts

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