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mathmath333

  • one year ago

How to graph this.

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  1. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    \(\large \color{black}{\begin{align} \mid y\mid \geq 1\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ \end{align}}\)

  2. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    \[\left| y \right| \ge 1 \] means that \[y \ge 1\] or \[y \le -1\] |dw:1434816235241:dw|

  3. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    u mean this one |dw:1434816613473:dw|

  4. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    yeah, that graph is lot neater, thanks!

  5. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    @Vocaloid but wolfram gave this as the graph |dw:1434816760211:dw|

  6. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    1. |y| >= 1 is a one variable inequality. so you'd use a number line. 2. If you want a xy plot, your plot should show regions for all values of y... like if y = -2, would your inequality satisfy ?? is it shown by that plot?

  7. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    point 1,2 satisfies your inequality, but the wolf graph says it doesn't :)

  8. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    wolf graph is wrong. it plots x =|y| and y =1

  9. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    how can i plot 1 in (1,2) there is no space for x co-ordinate

  10. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    it should have plotted x=1 instead of y=1

  11. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434817459914:dw|

  12. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434817543444:dw|

  13. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    how do you sketch y = 1 in 1D, 2D and 3D ?

  14. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434817611958:dw|

  15. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    the wolf graph took vertical axis as 'x' ! lol

  16. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    if you want a 2D graph for |y|>=1, then the first graph is correct

  17. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    Haha wolfram is trolling us |dw:1434817710812:dw|

  18. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    |y|≥1 means that y≥1 or y≤−1 is absolutely correct

  19. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    but why is that desmos graphing calculator also cannot graph \(|y|\geq 1\) when i input the syntax.

  20. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    As the question stands, nobody can stop me from thinking of \(y\) as distance from origin (polar) ;p |dw:1434817996160:dw|

  21. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    "We don't solve complicated single variable equations yet" lol true ganeshie! it depends on how we want to graph...multiple correct answers.

  22. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    although the best thing to do here is to plot on the number line!

  23. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    so this below graph correct for \(|y| \geq 1\) |dw:1434818180900:dw|

  24. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    yeah some are ridiculous and some are more or less obvious from the context

  25. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    yes, it is math. verify by taking different values of y

  26. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    ok thnx

  27. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    hm, I suppose graphing calculators/graphing software is usually designed to handle x and y together think of it this way: we can graph y = 1, right? it's just a horizontal line through y = 1 y > 1 is just everything shaded above that line.

  28. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    y=1 is a point on a number line. y= 1 is a line in xy plot: 2D y=1 is a plane in xyz plot: 3D

  29. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    ^ that, too :)

  30. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    i have checked in geogebra too, it also can't plot \(|y|\geq 1\)

  31. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    But you can.

  32. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    try below in geogebra abs(y) >= 1

  33. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    so you > desmos/geogebra :P :)

  34. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    We created Desmos and Geogebra. Humans 1 - 0 Computers

  35. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    tried this "abs(y) >= 1" , nothing happened from geogebra

  36. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    after all man made computer , computer did'nt made man

  37. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    id love to be in a matrix for a change

  38. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    |y| >= 1 the first thought that came to mind, all values of y, that are greater than 1, irrespective of the sign of the number....

  39. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    There's really not much to think about this problem. You just find the set of points with the absolute value of their y-coordinate either 1 or greater than that. So the "base"-set of points would be points with y-coordinate = 1. I just realised that it's exactly what hartnn explained but I don't want to remove this reply so yeah

  40. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434819148818:dw|

  41. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434819259110:dw|

  42. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434819280155:dw|

  43. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434819455607:dw|

  44. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    close enough

  45. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    your painting looks way prettier than the original smith !

  46. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Of course it does - where do you think Smith was inspired from?

  47. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1434819600999:dw|

  48. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    i remember something like matrix was inspired from Gita

  49. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Yes, and that is obviously not true...

  50. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    if i have to plot the graph for this \(y\geq |1|\) then will it also be same as \(|y|\geq 1\)

  51. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    |1| is just 1, right ?

  52. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    but |-1| is also 1

  53. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    but your question does not have |-1|

  54. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    y >=|1| is same as y>=1 all y values greater than 1. so y will take only positive values, not negative

  55. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    solving \(y>=|1|\)this by algebra will give me this this two inequalities \( y>=1\) and \(y>=-1\) right ?

  56. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    It might help to think of \(|y|\) as \(|y-0|\), the distance between a point \(y\) on number line.and origin \(0\)

  57. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    \(|1|\) is same as \(|1-0|\) the distance between points \(1\) and \(0\) on number line

  58. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    if there is a variable inside |...| only then it would lead to 2 posibilities if there is a constant, then its a unique value...thats why its called a constant

  59. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    ohk

  60. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    @ParthKohli https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=re7nmrDbAG4

  61. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    i got a question based on this one If \(|y|\geq 1\) and \(x=-|a|y\) , then which one of the following is true? \(\large \color{black}{\begin{align} a.)\ a-xy<0\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ b.)\ a-xy\geq 0\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ c.)\ a-xy>0\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ d.)\ a-xy\leq 0\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ \end{align}}\)

  62. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Since all of the questions involve the expression \(a - xy\), let's try to check its nature.\[a - xy\]\[=a - |a|y^2 \]Now \(y^2 \ge 1 \) so this expression is \(0 \) for \(y = \pm 1\) and positive \(a\). As soon as you change \(y\), it would become negative.

  63. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    ** a + |a|y^2

  64. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Oh wow, skipped that negative sign. =_=

  65. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    OK thanks, then it should be positive. Looks good.

  66. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    |a|y^2 is always positive

  67. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    yes, just because |y| >=1 we can say a will be less than or = |a|y^2 numerically and that would make a+ |a|y^2 always positive :)

  68. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    OK, a better word would be "nonnegative".

  69. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    can be 0 ? y can't be 0

  70. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    a =0 :P

  71. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    so only options 'b' and 'd' are valid

  72. ParthKohli
    • one year ago
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    Ew, what am I even talking about

  73. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    b says a-xy is 0 or positive (non-negative) d says a-xy is 0 or negative (non-positive)

  74. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    can \(a\) be 0

  75. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    sure

  76. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    so option be would be correct

  77. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    \(\Huge \checkmark \)

  78. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    thnx!

  79. hartnn
    • one year ago
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    wlcmx!

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