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anonymous

  • one year ago

This problem is as simple as short. Just find how many numbers from A to B with sum of digits from X to Y are divisible by K. Input The first line contains 5 space-separated positive integers: A, B, X, Y, K Output Output one number - answer for the question. Constraints 0 < A, B, K ≤ 1013 0 < X, Y ≤ 1000 A ≤ B 0 < A, B, ≤ 107 in 32 % of the test data Sample Input(Plaintext Link) 5 86 1 6 4 Sample Output(Plaintext Link) 6

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @hartnn @hba @dan815 @asnaseer @KaylaIsBae @xavierbo2 @zepdrix @SkyeWutRUdoin @Goku-Kai @DullJackel09

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Explanation There are 6 such numbers: 12, 20, 24, 32, 40, 60

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Lyrae

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    In what language? C / C++/ Python?????

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    C/C++ @Nixy

  6. woodrow73
    • one year ago
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    People aren't here to supply answers for homework-ish questions. More so for teaching; if you put forth an effort to solve the problem, and you get stuck somewhere - that's when you should come ask for help.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Woodrow73 I 'd suggest if you can't help out anyone better you don't post such ill-bred comments . without knowing that if it's my home work or not,no one have right to give such discourteous suggestions! THANKS!

  8. woodrow73
    • one year ago
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    Sorry; since it wasn't anything positive to add, I shouldn't have commented. Though, I will say - from the perspective of someone in the position to help - in order to further your understanding, you should try the problem first and report of what obstacles you ran into. Then, we can help remove those obstacles until you have an understanding of how to solve the problem yourself.

  9. woodrow73
    • one year ago
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    Maybe I got tired of saying 'what did you get so far' in a number of posts - but now I realize, that I don't have time to walk people through understanding a problem if they don't first attempt it. Though those same questions get people who just post the answer, or people who can take the time to make sure one understands a problem.. that's fine too.

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spraguer (Moderator)
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