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anonymous

  • one year ago

Someone Help!! An electron with a charge of -1.6 x 10^-19 coulombs experiences a field of 1.4 x 10^5 newtons/coulomb. What is the magnitude of the electric force on this electron due to this field? If you could please show the steps, I would be very appreciative! :)

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You can start with the expression for the electric force, the force acting upon a charged particle when immersed in an electric field: \[\vec F = q \vec E\] from that you can get the magnitude of the force as the product of the charge times the magnitude of the electric field...

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay...so the equation would look something like...this?: 1.4 x 10^5 = -1.6 x 10^-19(E)

  3. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    No, you're given the Electric field not the force.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh! So F = -1.6 x 10^-19 * 1.4 x 10^5 would be the correct format?

  5. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes, and since your charge is negative, it means the electric force and field are in opposite directions.

  6. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    But your question is asking for the magnitude, so I guess you don't need to worry about the direction.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm trying to calculate, but it's giving me -2.24e-14, am I doing something wrong? You have to convert the two parts into decimal form, correct?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i get the same number for the force magnitude: \(F=2.24\times 10^{-14}N\)

  9. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    For the magnitude it's best you take the absolute value as @Greg_D has presented.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    In the answers they have to choose from, I believe 2.2 x 10^-14N would be the closest? Thank you so much, the both of you :)

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes, that is what you get if you round to 1 decimal figure. good work!

  12. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Nice :)

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