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anonymous

  • one year ago

Find the rate of change

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ummm

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    let me try

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okk

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    answer choice?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @aloud can you help me out?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it's not any answer choices

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    kind in a tight situation

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i have to go in couple min

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    lol ya ik me to

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @H3LPN33DED help plz?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @TillLindemann

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sorry dianolove idk this one i am only in geometry

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it's okk

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    (1,2) (2,3)

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @braydenbunner

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @aloud, that would be an approximation of the rate of change

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    however, at the point (2,3) -tangent to curve you would have an exact rate of change

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so the rate of change is (2,3)

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The way to solve this exercise is to first find the equation of the parabola, followed by the derivative of it and for that you will have to choose a particular x - value.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    like (2,1)

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What aboyt the reverse, @Hoslos , if you know the derivative at a point, can you integrate to find original function?

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Let us find the equation of the parabola, using the formula: \[y=a(x-p)^{2}+q\], where x,y is from any coordinate of the graph and p and q are the x and y - values of the vertex, respectively. The first attempt is to find a . Replacing values, we get: \[1=a(1-3)^{2}+2\] \[1=a(-2)^{2}+2\] \[1-2=4a\] \[a=-0.25\] Next we re-write the equation, by now putting a and the vertex coordinates, giving us: \[y=-0.25(x-3)^{2} +2\]

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Well, the rate of change will have to end at the derivative, which will mean the change in y with respect to x, @BPDlkeme234 .

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i'm sorry this is just hard

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    As for the second part, you differentiate the equation of the formula: \[\frac{ d _{y} }{ d _{x} }= -0.5(x-3)\] There it is. Depending on the question, they would tell you a particular value of x runing in the graph. For instance let us say, when the x-value is 2. The rate of change will be \[-0.5(2-3)=0.5units/time\] Any question on differentiation, please ask.

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thanks for tryin i still dont get it but thanks

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