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anonymous

  • one year ago

please help medal will be awarded Which sequence is modeled by the graph below?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Ok, the x-coordinate is the number of the term, and y-coordinate is the term. \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle ( }\) Such that \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle {\rm a}_{~x}~=~y~~) }\)

  3. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    So, you have 3 points: (2,1) (3,3) (4,9) what these points mean, is that \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_2=1 }\) \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_3=3 }\) \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_4=9 }\)

  4. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    so, can you see the pattern here?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    that goes up by 3

  6. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    you mean multiplying times 3 each time, right?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  8. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    ok.

  9. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Did they give you the question as it is, without any options to it?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the options are an=1/3(27)^n-1 an= 27(1/3)^n-1 an= 1/3(3)^n-1 an= 3(1/2)^n-1

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i feel like it is the third one because of the pattern u told me

  12. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yes, it is the third one. (not because of the pattern that i told you, but because of the pattern that you noticed)

  13. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    the recursive formulas in every other option besides C have a wrong common ratio (not r=3)

  14. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Any questions?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  16. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Oh, sure:) GO ahead...

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Jeff is designing the seating arrangement for a concert in his high school theater. To give everyone a good view, each row must have 5 more seats than the row before it, and the 1st row can only have 12 seats. Help Jeff plan the rest of the seating by solving for how many seats are in row 25. Then explain to Jeff how to create an equation to predict the number of seats in any row. Show your work, and use complete sentences

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im really confused

  19. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    So, lets do this piece by piece. `each row has 5 more seats than the row before it` \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle \left(a_{n+1}\right) =\left(a_1\right)+5 }\) `and the first row can only have 12 seats.` \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{1}=12 }\) `help Jeff plan the rest of the seating by solving for how many seats are in row 25` find \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{25} }\)

  20. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    I wrote a phrase in gray, and below, a conversion of the statement into math.... is this understandable?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is a25 =300

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so that means its 480

  24. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    lets, see... based on the first statement we know the common difference is 5. (that is d=5) \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{n}=a_1+5(n-1) }\) plugging in our information \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{25}=12+5(25-1) }\)

  25. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{25}=12+5(25-1) }\) \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{25}=12+5(24) }\) \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{25}=12+5(20) +5(4) }\) \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{25}=12+100 +20 }\) \(\large\color{black}{ \displaystyle a_{25}=132 }\)

  26. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    i am writing it out like this, because I don't have a calc near by...

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so how do you create an equation

  28. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    create which equation"?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    to predict the number of seats in any row

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i guess the answer will be Row one= 12 Row two= 12 + 5 The equation will be: Row n = 12+5(n-1) Where n is random number, the row will have 12 seats plus 5 for every row higher than 1. So row 25 will have 12 + 5*(25-1) 12+24*5=12+120=132 Row 25 will have 132 seats.

  31. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yes

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can i ask Another question

  33. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    ok... i will try my best

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Tommy has $350 of his graduation gift money saved at home, and the amount is modeled by the function h(x) = 350. He reads about a bank that has savings accounts that accrue interest according to the function s(x) = (1.04)^x − 1. After combining the two functions, his new function is g(x) = 350(1.04)^x − 1. Using complete sentences, explain what this new function means

  35. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    okay.

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im really confused again

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