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vera_ewing

  • one year ago

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  1. paki
    • one year ago
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    what you guess here about the answer...?

  2. paki
    • one year ago
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    have a look here, then tell me.... https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Urbanization_in_Africa

  3. paki
    • one year ago
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    how about this one...? http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-now/essays/african-immigration-colonial-america

  4. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    In the colonial times called for war recruitment which scared away many civilians in fear of war; my best answer would be C based upon the evidence provided.

  5. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    "The Impact of African Nationalism World War I was a large bump in the road for Europe’s power in Africa. The huge war in Europe distracted the colonialist nations from the task of developing and administering the colonies; and the need for military manpower sapped the colonies of a significant percentage of their white administrative class. Meanwhile, a small but appreciable number of Africans attended European-run secondary schools in the French colony of Senegal and the British colony of South Africa. A still smaller, but increasingly influential, group of Africans was given the opportunity to attend universities in Britain, France, and the United States. As students, Africans were exposed to the histories of the European nations and the theories of nationalism and liberty. It was impossible to overlook the contrast between the colonizers’ ideology of freedom and justice, and their colonial practice of racial discrimination. Awareness of this contrast sowed frustration and bitterness in Africa. Education also gave Africans the skills in English and French that would enable them to express anticolonialist ideas to white and black people alike. As the ranks of European colonial administrators thinned, their positions were increasingly taken by Africans with secondary school educations, who thereby acquired the skills of managing a modern, complex society. Meanwhile, African soldiers in the armies of Copyright © 2012, K12 Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced in whole or in part, including illustrations, without the express prior written consent of K12 Inc. Unit 10, Lesson 14 9 European nations were gaining skills of military tactics, and of the use of weapons and explosives, that later helped them in armed anticolonial struggle. Many Africans who had participated in the Allied war effort were disappointed in the lack of reward or recognition of African contribution to the Allied cause. African colonists had anticipated that after the end of the war, the colonizers would institute social reforms and grant Africans more political power as a reward for their contributions to victory. The words of U.S. president Woodrow Wilson during the war also had a profound effect on those who would form the African Nationalist movement. Africans heard him speak in favor of national self-determination. Wilson’s assertions that colonial powers needed to act responsibly toward the colonized peoples also struck home with Africans. However, improvements in Africans’ participation in their own political future were few and far between. Notably, Africans had achieved the right to be represented in the French National Assembly. The first such representative, Blaise Diagne of Senegal, had led a recruitment drive of Senegalese soldiers in World War I in exchange for a promise that Senegalese people would be made French citizens after the war. Most promises of better conditions, however, went unfulfilled in the 1920s. Strikes and riots sometimes occurred as expressions of African frustration. In the 1930s, the Great Depression led to greater African economic misery, which in turn led to increased protests. Then, in World War II, Africans once again heard Europeans condemning racism (in this case the racism of the Nazis) and urging national liberation (the liberation of Nazi-occupied European states), while continuing to practice racism and occupy countries in Africa. The double standard—freedom and justice for white Europeans, and discrimination and colony status for black Africans—bred anger in those who suffered because of it. So for the second time, a world war provided the impetus for African nationalist movements to grow. Members of the African Nationalist Movement Ideas of African nationalism had begun to take hold among the native urban intel" This describes about the war recruitment

  6. paki
    • one year ago
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    Main cause of migration at that time were high taxes too... @vera_ewing

  7. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    Yes high taxes were a contributing factor; although slavery and fear of staying in a country that is unsafe isn't peaceful; how could you pay taxes in fear of staying in unsafe environment?

  8. paki
    • one year ago
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    i will go for A...

  9. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    Best way for us to know is please read the evident material and make a honest decision; why would someone pay to stay in a country of higher taxes if being recruited for war? Both answers seem right but we need to connect it together

  10. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    @vera_ewing please read that excerpt and let me know what you feel is correct in your opinion

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