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anonymous

  • one year ago

The gene for a widow's peak is dominant. A child inherits genes with the genotype: Ww and Ww. What are the chances that he will have a widow's peak? 25% chance 50% chance 75% chance 100% chance

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Aureyliant

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do you know how to do Punnet squares?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    To figure this out you need to draw a punnet square. to do this draw a table with 9 cells (squares for the writing, 3 rows, 3 columns) then leave the top left blank (you will not use this), draw in the first column second row down a W then below that a w, then in the top row in column two draw a W and in column three top row (top right cell) draw a w. Then in the 4 cells next to each other pair up the letter, for instance in this the first cell of the four (top left within these four not the very top left) will be WW. Once all the four have been paired this will be the genotypes of the offspring. Now the genotypes will be: WW Ww Ww ww seeing as widows peak is dominant, it will be represented by the captial W. This means it will over-ride the w which is recessive. so the phenotypes (expression of the genotype) is: WW - widows peak. Ww - widows peak. Ww - widows peak. ww - no widows peak. therefore, since there are three out of four with a widows peak and one out of four with no widows peak the chances are: widows peak 3:1 or 75% widows peak. 25% lacking widows peak. If you had trouble with my explanation of the punnet square watch this :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prkHKjfUm...

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You copy and pasted that sweetie ;)

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i cant take credit for this sooo https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20121203072635AAq2dnv

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no duh

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    lol

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    c?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yup

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes :)

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    medaled you Aureyliant

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