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anonymous

  • one year ago

the results of a medical test show that of 32 people selected at random who were given the test, 2 tested positive and 30 tested negative. Determine the odds in favor of a person selected at random testing positive on the test.

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  1. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    The odds are the ratio of the probability of an event occurring to that of its not occurring. What is the experimental probability of a randomly tested person testing positive?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you lost me with that last part.

  3. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    The experimental probability of a randomly tested person testing positive is given by: \[\large \frac{number\ testing\ positive}{total\ number\ tested}\]

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so it would be as simple as 2/64?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    then simplify it obviously

  6. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Where did '64' come from?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    crap so it would just be "32" sorry insomnia is setting in!

  8. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Yes, the experimental probability of a randomly tested person testing positive is 2/32. Next step: What is experimental probability of a randomly tested person testing negative?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so it would be 30/32?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    testing negative.

  11. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Correct. So looking at the definition of odds: 'The odds are the ratio of the probability of an event occurring to that of its not occurring.' So an initial result for the required odds in favor of a person selected at random testing positive on the test is: 2/32 : 30/32 which can be simplified. Can you simplify it?

  12. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    The aim is to simplify \[\large \frac{2}{32}:\frac{30}{32}\] to get an integer on each side.

  13. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Multiply each term by 32/2

  14. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    \[\large (\frac{2}{32}\times\frac{32}{2}):(\frac{30}{32}\times\frac{32}{2})=?\]

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry I was reading the book and it gave me a weird formula I was trying to wrap my head around based on what we were working on

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it should be 1:15 if I did my math right

  17. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Correct :)

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Theres a formula for odds in favor, the way you just walked out, is that the same process?

  19. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    If the probability of an event A occurring is P(A) and the probability of event A not occurring is \[\large P(\bar{A})\] then the odds in favor of event A is given by \[\large P(A):P(\bar{A})\] This is the method that I used.

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    awesome, ok I think I have it. up for helping me with a couple more?

  21. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    You're welcome :)

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