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anonymous

  • one year ago

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Which parts are you having trouble with? For example can you do section 1 of the question?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Im having ahard time analyzing 2,4 and 6..

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh and even 5

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hmm. @kropot72 . The first condition was a' u c.. what does it mean?

  6. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Looking at part 1 \[\large A'\cup C\] means the union of the complement of subset A and subset C.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so the answer would be {3,4,5} right?

  8. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Not really. The complement of A, denoted by A' is the set of elements which belong to S but do not belong to A. Can you try find A' as a first step in solving part 1 and post your result.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  10. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Your calculation does not have the complement of A, which the question writes as A'. My previous posting explained the meaning of the complement of A. Please refer to it.

  11. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    S = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9} A = {2, 4, 7, 9} A' = {?, ?, ?, ?, ?}

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1,3,,5,6,8,

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh sorry. The condition was a' u c not s. =)

  14. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    As you posted, A' = {1, 3, 5, 6, 8} Now what is the union of A' and C?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    3,4,5 right?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But what if.. the condition was like this? [a' u c]'.. is it a null set?

  17. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Not really. You need to find the union of A' = {1, 3, 5, 6, 8} and C = {2, 3, 4, 5}.

  18. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    The union of A' and C is the set of all those elements, each one of which belongs to A' or to C, or belongs to both A' and C.

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so its 1,2,3,4

  20. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Why have you not included 5, 6 and 8?

  21. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    5 is in A' and C. 6 and 8 are both in C.

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ah yes. Im sorry. Im still digesting this complement thing

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How about no. 3? |dw:1435210474368:dw|

  24. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    np. So we have \[\large A'\cup C={1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8}\]

  25. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    With curly brackets at the start and end of the elements.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    =)

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ahm. Ill try to answer the no. 3 condition..

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is it 1,7,9?

  29. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    \[\large B\cap C'\] means the intersection of B and the complement of C'. The intersection is the set of all elements common to both B and C'.

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the intersection would be 3,5

  31. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Yes {1, 7, 9} is correct for section 3.

  32. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    Sorry, I must log out for a while to eat. Perhaps I can continue later. Hope I have been of some help.

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sure thing @kropot72 Thank you thank you so much =)

  34. kropot72
    • one year ago
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    You're welcome :)

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