A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

BeccaB003

  • one year ago

Question about probability. I appreciate the help!

  • This Question is Closed
  1. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    This table is an example of the principle of independence. This table is not an example of the principle of independence. There is not enough information to answer this question.

    1 Attachment
  2. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I need help understanding principle independence. @jim_thompson5910 Thanks!

  3. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    How many people have a membership?

  4. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    40

  5. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    this is out of 70 people total so P(has membership) = 40/70 = 4/7

  6. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    what is the probability a person attends one or more of the classes offered?

  7. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    31--that is if we are talking about people with and without memberships. Only with memberships is 17 and without membership is 14.

  8. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so the probability someone attends 1 or more classes is 31/70

  9. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    now IF the two events (shown below) * has membership * attends 1 or more classes are independent, then P( has membership AND attends 1 or more classes) = P(has membership) * P(attends 1 or more classes)

  10. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    does that look familiar?

  11. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes, it does. So, P(40) * P(31) =1240 Right?

  12. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    And the answer would be: This table is an example of the principle of independence. (choices listed above)

  13. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    P( has membership AND attends 1 or more classes) = P(has membership) * P(attends 1 or more classes) P( has membership AND attends 1 or more classes) = (4/7) * (31/70) P( has membership AND attends 1 or more classes) = 62/245 do you see how I got that?

  14. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh! *slaps forehead* Yes, sorry I wasn't thinking and ignored what you'd said before about the problem. I understand it now.

  15. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    how many people fit these requirements has membership AND attends 1 or more classes

  16. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Isn't that just what we solved for? 62/245? And how does this correlate to the principle of independence?

  17. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    look for the "has membership" row and the "1 or more classes" column what number is there?

  18. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    17

  19. LynFran
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @jim_thompson5910 when you finish here can u please visit the link in ur notification this question needs a 2nd opinion thanks

  20. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    since it's 17 out of 70 total the actual probability P( has membership AND attends 1 or more classes) should be 17/70

  21. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    and not 62/245

  22. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    you only multiply IF the two events are independent thinking in reverse, if you can multiply and get the same result as looking in the table, then the events are independent

  23. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    but 17/70 is not equal to 62/245 so they are not independent events

  24. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thank you so much! You explained everything very well. So, this table is not an example of the principle of independence because the two events don't equal each other?

  25. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    correct, there is some connection between the two events (one event is dependent on the other somehow)

  26. BeccaB003
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay, thank you so much. You are amazing!

  27. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    you're welcome

  28. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.