A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

mckenzieandjesus

  • one year ago

please help

  • This Question is Closed
  1. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @jim_thompson5910

    1 Attachment
  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Help with what though?

  3. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    jim_thompson5910 is helping me through message but he needed to see these images

  4. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I need help with this though Find the area of the triangle. 24 square units 11 square units 12 square units 5.5 square units

    1 Attachment
  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Area of a triangle is \[\large A=\frac{1}{2}\times height \times base\] The base is going to be the distance between the two bottom points. The height will be the distance between the middle of the base and the top point.

  6. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so the base would be 6?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Correct.

  8. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and 5 for height?

  9. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so 15?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Close, it would be 4

  11. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oops okay thanku!

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\huge \color{aqua}N\color{fuchsia}o \space \color{lime}P \color{orange}r \color{blue}o \color{maroon}b \color{red}l \color{olive}e \color{purple}m \ddot\smile \]

  13. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this is for the 4 circles image A point in the figure is selected at random. Find the probability that the point will be in the part that is NOT shaded.

  14. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @LegendarySadist

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Do they give you any units, or no?

  16. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @jim_thompson5910

  17. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well as we can see, the lengths of 2 diameters is the same as the length as one side of the square. If we say that the length of the side of the square is 4, then that means that the diameter of a circle is 1/4th that, or 1. Can you figure out the areas from that?

  19. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Im confused with this one too, i keep getting an answer thats not on my multiple choice Find the area of the kite. 190.44 m2 126.96 m2 253.92 m2 380.88 m2

    1 Attachment
  20. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    multiply the diagonals, then divide by 2

  21. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the diagonal lengths are given in pieces, so you'll have to add them up first

  22. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so theres 4 sides to a square 4+4+4+4= 16 and 16/ 1/4= 64 did i do it right?

  23. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @jim_thompson5910 all 4 of them?

  24. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the longer diagonal is 6.9+13.8 = 20.7

  25. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    do the same for the other diagonal multiply the diagonals, then divide by 2

  26. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so 6.9+13.8= 20.7 9.2+9.2= 18 2/5

  27. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    my calc isnt letting me put in 2/5 after 18

  28. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok its 380.88/2 = 190 11/25

  29. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so 190.44 m2 ?

  30. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @LegendarySadist so theres 4 sides to a square 4+4+4+4= 16 and 16/ 1/4= 64 did i do it right?

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Area of a square is \[\large A=side^{2}\] and area of a circle is \[\large A=\pi r^{2}\]

  32. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so \[4^{2} + 4^{2} + 4^{2} + 4^{2} = 64 ?\]

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Where are the 4 squares that you're adding together? What? It's JUST \(4^{2}\)

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\large 4^{2}=16\] Boom, now we have the area of the square.

  35. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[4^{2}= 16\]

  36. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oops

  37. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[16\div \frac{ 1 }{ 4 } = 64\]

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Now we find the area of the circle and multiply it by 4. Area of a circle is \(A=\pi r^{2}\) so if we want that times 4 it would look like \[\large A=4\pi r^{2}\] and HOW ARE YOU GETTING 64????

  39. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    u said the diameter of a circle is 1/4th that? above^

  40. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sorry got confused.. what do i put for r?

  41. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so 4*3.14*5^2 = 314 could i do that or?

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So the diamater of two circles is the side length. So \[\large 2d=side\] Since the radius is half of the diamater, it would be \[\large 4r=side\] The side is 4, as we know, so it would be \[\large 4r=4\] which makes \[\large r=1\]

  43. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so 4*3.14*1^2 = 12 14/25

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yeah. Now to find the area of the unshaded region, just do \[\large Area~of~square~~-~~Area~of~circles~=~Area~of~unshaded~region\]

  45. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so 16-12 14/25= 86/25

  46. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so 25%? or?

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    To find the chance of getting the unshaded region, so \[\large \frac{Area~of~Unshaded~region}{Area~of~square}\]

  48. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\frac{ 86 }{ 25 } \div 16 = \frac{ 43 }{ 200 }\]

  49. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thats not on my answers though..

  50. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    In percentage form, it's 21.5% tho

  51. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah in decimal form its 0.215 so i guess i got confused

  52. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    should of converted the decimal to percentage oops

  53. mckenzieandjesus
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thank you!

  54. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\huge \color{aqua}N\color{fuchsia}o \space \color{lime}P \color{orange}r \color{blue}o \color{maroon}b \color{red}l \color{olive}e \color{purple}m \ddot\smile \]

  55. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.