anonymous
  • anonymous
CAN SOMEBODY HELP ME WITH MY POST TEST WITH CREDIT RECOVERY
English
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
CAN SOMEBODY HELP ME WITH MY POST TEST WITH CREDIT RECOVERY
English
katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
What does this excerpt from act 1 of Romeo and Juliet reveal about the Montague-Capulet feud? ABRAHAM: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir? SAMPSON: I do bite my thumb, sir. ABRAHAM: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir? SAMPSON: (aside to GREGORY) Is the law of our side, if I say ay? GREGORY: No. SAMPSON: No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but I bite my thumb, sir. GREGORY: Do you quarrel, sir? ABRAHAM: Quarrel sir! no, sir. SAMPSON: If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you. ABRAHAM: No better. SAMPSON: Well, sir. GREGORY: Say 'better:' here comes one of my master's kinsmen. SAMPSON: Yes, better, sir. ABRAHAM: You lie. SAMPSON: Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The servants are more serious about the feud than their masters. The servants of both households use the feud as an excuse to pick fights with each other. The Capulet-Montague feud is petty, foolish, and easily blown out of proportion. The servants don’t take the feud seriously and are disinterested in its outcome. The young noblemen of both houses use the feud as an excuse to pick fights.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i believe its the 2nd one

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Read this excerpt from act I, scene I, of Richard III. What two purposes does this soliloquy serve in the opening scene? RICHARD III (Duke of Gloucester): Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York; And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house In the deep bosom of the ocean buried. Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths; Our bruised arms hung up for monuments; Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings, Our dreadful marches to delightful measures. Grim-visaged war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front; And now, instead of mounting barded steeds To fright the souls of fearful adversaries, He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber To the lascivious pleasing of a lute. But I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks, Nor made to court an amorous looking-glass; I, that am rudely stamp'd, and want love's majesty To strut before a wanton ambling nymph; I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion, Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, Deformed, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them; Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace, Have no delight to pass away the time, Unless to spy my shadow in the sun And descant on mine own deformity: And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover, To entertain these fair well-spoken days, I am determined to prove a villain And hate the idle pleasures of these days. Plots have I laid, inductions dangerous, By drunken prophecies, libels and dreams, To set my brother Clarence and the king In deadly hate the one against the other: And if King Edward be as true and just As I am subtle, false and treacherous, This day should Clarence closely be mew'd up, About a prophecy, which says that 'G' Of Edward's heirs the murderer shall be. It depicts the motivations and personality of the character. It introduces and develops the major characters of the play. It describes a climactic point in the plot of the play. It creates an atmosphere of hope and happiness. It gives some background information about the plot.

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