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anonymous

  • one year ago

In some bees, thin stripes (S) are dominant over thick stripes (s) and black eyes (B) are dominant over gray eyes (b). Complete a dihybrid cross for parents with the genotypes: SsBB x ssBb and answer the following in complete sentences. (5 points) 1. Describe how you would set up a Punnett square for this cross. 2. List the likelihood of each possible offspring genotype. 3. List the likelihood of each possible offspring phenotype.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @zepdrix

  2. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    \(\Large\rm\color{blue}{Welcome~to~OpenStudy!}\) @ABates98 \(\\Please ~show~us~ the ~solutions~ which~ you ~tried,~!!\)

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A di-hybrid cross is going to give you a punnet square with 16 results. Here is an example of a dihybrid cross between two heterozygous individuals using Aa and Bb to represent the dominant and recessive alleles for genes and A and B. A genotype is a unique set of alleles. For example; AaBb, AABb, aaBb, AaBB, Aabb, AABB, aabb. Each occurrence of a possible genotype can be counted in the punnet square and then the ratio of that genotype to the total number of genotypes (?/16 for a dihybrid cross) will give you the frequency or "likelihood" of that genotype occurring. A phenotype is more generalized than a genotype because several different genotypes can yield the same phenotype. For example, if "A" represents brown fur and "a" represents white fur, and capital letters indicate dominance, then the genotypes AA, Aa and aA would all result in animals with brown fur. By reading the punnet square and recording how many times each phenotype will be produced, one can calculate the "likelihood" of that phenotype being produced.

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  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay. That's making sense but do you know the answers to 1,2, and 3? @eabollich

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