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anonymous

  • one year ago

In the figure, polygon ABCD is dilated by a factor of 2 to produce A′B′C′D′ with the origin as the center of dilation. Where is point A' and D' located at??

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is the graph

  2. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    When you dialate with a factor of 2, do you know what you do to the points?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no i dont understand at all. its my first day veiwing geometry

  4. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    Well, dialate can sort of be explained as scaling. If I scale a drawing it means to change the size. That help?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yea but what do i do with the points, do i divide or anything is there an equation??

  6. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    Well, the factor is what the change in size is. You do not devide by it when going from the original to the changed one.

  7. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435471251448:dw| If a is a 1 by 1 box and b is a 4 by 4 box, then a is dialated to b by multiplying all points by 4. However, if I wanted to dialate from b to a I would multiply all points by \(\tfrac{1}{4}\).

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so in this problem would I multiply all the points by 1/2??

  9. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    No. They gave you a factor of 2. So it needs to double in size.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so i multiply the points. so the word dilate could also mean to get bigger in size??

  11. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    Yes, you multiply. Dialate means scale or change in size. If you scale by \(\tfrac{1}{4}\) then it would get smaller. So it can be bigger or smaller. It just depends on if the factor is greater than one or between 0 and 1.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    OMG THANKS SO MUCH! i got it righ!

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    right*

  14. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    Some examples here too: http://regentsprep.org/regents/math/geometry/GT3/indexGT3.htm But yah, once you get the idea that the dialation fact is the key for how much bigger or smaller it is, then it begins to make sense. Oh, and you can end up with fractions that make it bigger, like \(\tfrac{3}{2}\). It is more than 1 since it is 3 halfs, so it would still make it bigger.

  15. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    So, what points did you get for A' and D' in (x,y) form?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i got -2,-2 and 4,-2

  17. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    Yep. So you understand it just fine as far as I can see. =)

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thanks so much!

  19. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
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    Glad to help.

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