anonymous
  • anonymous
Find the standard form of the equation of the parabola with a focus at (-8, 0) and a directrix at x = 8.
Mathematics
katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Hero
  • Hero
Okay, go ahead and solve it using the formula I gave you previously. This time, the point for the directrix will be (8,y).
anonymous
  • anonymous
working it meow

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anonymous
  • anonymous
I got \[y=x-8\sqrt{2}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Hero
  • Hero
You should show the complete work you did on it. From what I observe, your final answer doesn't seem to have the right form.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Im skipping the first step cause It takes so long to write \[\large x^2 + 64 +y^2 = x^2 - 64 +x^2 - y^2\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hero \[\large 64 = x^2 - y^2 - 64\] I feel like this is a formula of some sort...
Hero
  • Hero
Skipping steps doesn't sound like such a good idea.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I didn't skip any but the first where you plug in the values
anonymous
  • anonymous
next i did this: \[\large y^2 = x^2 - 128\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Then took the square root of both sides
Hero
  • Hero
That still doesn't look right.
Hero
  • Hero
You must have made another mistake.
Hero
  • Hero
BTW, \(y^2 + y^2 = 2y^2\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
left that out by accident
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\large 64 = -2y^2 +x^2 -64\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Does that look right?
Hero
  • Hero
I wrote out the steps by hand myself. There's a reason why I wanted you to post each step you did just like last time. If you skip steps, you end up confusing yourself. Also, if you never got to the point where you end up using difference of squares, then you may have made yet another mistake.
Hero
  • Hero
I recommend starting over but posting each step this time
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright one sec
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\large (x+8)^2 +y^2 = (x-8)^2 + (x-y)^2\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\large then: x^2 +64 +y^2 = x^2 -64 +x^2 - y^2\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do you see any problems yet? @hero
Hero
  • Hero
Yes, I do actually. Double check your work.
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\large x^2 + 64 +y^2 = x^2 +64 +x^2 +y^2\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is that correct?
Hero
  • Hero
|dw:1435529904593:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh Sh*t
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can't believe I didn't see that earlier
Hero
  • Hero
What didn't you see earlier?
anonymous
  • anonymous
in the last parentheses in the formula I put an x instead of a y
anonymous
  • anonymous
And when I simplify that down it comes out to \[\large y=\sqrt{-32x}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
unless I did that extremely wrong which I felt like I did
Hero
  • Hero
Yes, because you should have isolated x instead of y.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok. So what you had was correct
Hero
  • Hero
The parabola is horizontal instead of vertical.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh yeah XD Derp
anonymous
  • anonymous
I have some more if you don't mind :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Different type of question
Hero
  • Hero
Actually, I'm about to log off soon. Others should be available to help.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok thanks @hero

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