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anonymous

  • one year ago

A recipe calls for cups of flour,  cup of white sugar, and  cup of brown sugar. The recipe makes 6 servings. (a) How many cups of flour are there per serving? Show your work. (b) How many total cups of sugar (white and brown) are there per serving? Show your work. (c) Suppose you modify the recipe so that it makes 9 servings. How much more flour do you need for the modified recipe than you need for the original recipe? Show your work

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Please Put it in a Neat format so it is easy to understand Like A. (Numbers B. (Numbers) C. (Numbers)

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @dan815 @perl

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @ganeshie8

  4. dan815
    • one year ago
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    the fractions are not showing up what does it say there

  5. dan815
    • one year ago
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    http://prntscr.com/7mntcp

  6. dan815
    • one year ago
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    thats what i see, fix that

  7. dan815
    • one year ago
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    baby..

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A recipe calls for cups 1 1/3 of flour, 1/2 cup of white sugar, and 2/3  cup of brown sugar. The recipe makes 6 servings. (a) How many cups of flour are there per serving? Show your work. (b) How many total cups of sugar (white and brown) are there per serving? Show your work. (c) Suppose you modify the recipe so that it makes 9 servings. How much more flour do you need for the modified recipe than you need for the original recipe? Show your work

  9. dan815
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435577059909:dw|

  10. dan815
    • one year ago
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    now u see all these make 6 servings

  11. dan815
    • one year ago
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    so if u use 1/6th of all this you get the ammount for 1 serving

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes I do

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay.

  14. dan815
    • one year ago
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    does that make sense?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So the answer would be 1/6 Correct? for (a)

  16. dan815
    • one year ago
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    no lol what!?!

  17. dan815
    • one year ago
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    okay look at this other question

  18. dan815
    • one year ago
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    suppose I pay 2 dollars for 10 jelly beans

  19. dan815
    • one year ago
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    what does that mean 5 jelly beans cost

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1 dollar

  21. dan815
    • one year ago
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    right, what does that mean 1 jelly bean costs :P

  22. dan815
    • one year ago
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    you see in your mind you were able to do this split very intuitively

  23. dan815
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435577369110:dw|

  24. dan815
    • one year ago
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    you saw the 10 was split in half so u split the 2 in half too

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So we have to Add All the Fractions Together? Correct?

  26. dan815
    • one year ago
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    wait answer this question first, how much is 1 jelly bean?

  27. dan815
    • one year ago
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    I split the 10 beans into 10 parts to get 1 bean

  28. dan815
    • one year ago
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    so you have to split the only into 10 parts too, and see how much is in each part, this is known as divisiion

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.4

  30. dan815
    • one year ago
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    not quite

  31. dan815
    • one year ago
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    10 was split into 10 parts to get 1 in each part 2 dollars split into 10 parts to get ___ in each part?

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry to be rude But im Kinda in a Hurry could we speed this up xD

  33. dan815
    • one year ago
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    im trying to go as fast as possible here

  34. dan815
    • one year ago
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    The faster you understand the faster we can move on

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2/5 = 0.4 :P I did 2 divided by 5

  36. dan815
    • one year ago
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    its 2/10

  37. dan815
    • one year ago
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    2 = 10 jelly beans 2/10 = 10/10 jelly beans 0.2 = 1 jelly bean

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What Should I divided im trying to Understand but i Just dont get it with The Fractions part

  39. dan815
    • one year ago
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    same thing with the fractions

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so the Anwser is 0.2/0.20

  41. dan815
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435577709925:dw|

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay Add all fractions then Divide it By 6 Correct :D for Q.A

  43. dan815
    • one year ago
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    ahh maybe you should work on this when you have time,

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Lets do B.

  45. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Im trying to understand this :O

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @dan815 I think I got it after reviewing it :D

  47. perl
    • one year ago
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    *

  48. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Halp anyone Im begging you :(

  49. perl
    • one year ago
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    Do you mind me starting over?

  50. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  51. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I got (a).0.2 (b0 1 1/6

  52. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    (a). 0.2 (b). 1 1/6 (c).3 1/2

  53. perl
    • one year ago
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    A recipe calls for cups 1 1/3 or 4/3 cups of flour, 1/2 cup of white sugar, and 2/3  cup of brown sugar. The recipe makes 6 servings. (a) How many cups of flour are there per serving? Show your work. \[ \Large \rm \frac{4/3 ~ cups }{6~serving} = \frac{x~ cups}{1~serving}\]$$ \Large x = \frac 2 9 ~ \rm cups$$

  54. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So (a). 2/9 is that Correct :D

  55. perl
    • one year ago
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    Does that make sense how I got that, I made a proportion. and solve for x, cross multiply

  56. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes Exact Sense Thanks So much :D

  57. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Was I correct with B?

  58. perl
    • one year ago
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    A recipe calls for 4/3 cups of flour, 1/2 cup of white sugar, and 2/3  cup of brown sugar. The recipe makes 6 servings. (b) How many total cups of sugar (white and brown) are there per serving? Show your work. \[ \Large \rm \frac{1/2 + 2/3 ~ cups ~ sugar }{6~servings} = \frac{x~ cups~sugar}{1~serving}\]\[ \Large x = \frac {7}{36} ~ \rm cups~ sugar\]

  59. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    THX U R THE BEST! ( Sorry it to song long I was trying to figure out how to understand :P)

  60. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So*

  61. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay

  62. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do I add or times The White Sugar and Brown Sugar then X's it by 3?

  63. perl
    • one year ago
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    We can think about it logically. If the directions asked for 12 servings, that means we would double each part of the recipe. or multiply by 2. But the directions say to get 9 servings, that is not exactly double. Instead it is the factor 9/6 multiply each component of the recipe by 9/6

  64. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So WS x 9/6 and BS x 9/6 Correct?

  65. perl
    • one year ago
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    yes

  66. perl
    • one year ago
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    Assuming ws you mean white sugar.

  67. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Once I get the Anwser for Both do I add them together?

  68. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @perl Do i?

  69. perl
    • one year ago
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    We only need to find the additional amount of flour needed for 9 servings. Therefore multiply 9/6 by the flour amount for 6 servings. I may have misread the question.

  70. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so WS =3/4 BS= (1)

  71. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    WS + BS = 1 1/6

  72. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Subtract what??

  73. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    3/5

  74. perl
    • one year ago
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    Let's do it in steps.

  75. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  76. perl
    • one year ago
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    Let's post all the given info again A recipe calls for cups 4/3 of flour, 1/2 cup of white sugar, and 2/3  cup of brown sugar. The recipe makes 6 servings. Question Part c) (c) Suppose you modify the recipe so that it makes 9 servings. How much more flour do you need for the modified recipe than you need for the original recipe? The question is only asking about the additional flour needed to make 9 servings, not the sugar.

  77. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So, How do we get 9 servings :P I might be wrong

  78. perl
    • one year ago
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    we can multiply 9/6 by the old flour amount to get the new amount of flour needed for 9 servings

  79. perl
    • one year ago
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    you know what, let's use a proportion since that made sense earlier

  80. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    9/6 x 4/3?

  81. perl
    • one year ago
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    $$ \Large \frac{4/3 \rm~ cup ~flour}{6 ~\rm servings} = \frac{x \rm ~ cup ~flour}{9 ~ \rm servings} $$

  82. perl
    • one year ago
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    when we cross multiply we get 9 /6 * 4/3 = x

  83. perl
    • one year ago
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    Agreed?

  84. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay My keyboard got disconnected sorry :P

  85. perl
    • one year ago
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    So we are very close to finishing this. The only catch here is , the question asks for the additional amount of flour.

  86. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    = 2? correct

  87. perl
    • one year ago
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    The total amount of flour needed for 9 servings is 9/6 * 4/3 . We already have 4/3 cups. What is the additional amount. Hint, subtract

  88. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.6

  89. perl
    • one year ago
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    the question asks how much more flour. 0.6 is close, but lets make it exact

  90. perl
    • one year ago
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    The exact decimal is 0.666666... what nice fraction is this?

  91. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    3/5

  92. perl
    • one year ago
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    close , 2/3

  93. perl
    • one year ago
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    there are more decimals in 2/3

  94. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so C is 2/3

  95. perl
    • one year ago
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    you got it

  96. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oKay a few more

  97. perl
    • one year ago
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    Can you post a new question?

  98. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Emmanuel bought 40 lb of potting soil this week. This amount is 4 lb more than three times the amount of potting soil he bought last week. Answer the following questions to find the number of pounds of soil Emmanuel purchased last week. (a) What is the unknown information? (b) Let p represent the unknown information. Write an equation to model the problem. (c) Which number 10, 11, or 12 will solve the equation in Part B? Show your work. (d) How many pounds of potting soil did Emmanuel buy last week?

  99. perl
    • one year ago
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    In case I get disconnected.

  100. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hello Anyone there

  101. perl
    • one year ago
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    Which part do you have difficulty with?

  102. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    these questions then we are done :P

  103. perl
    • one year ago
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    Emmanuel bought 40 lb of potting soil this week. This amount is 4 lb more than three times the amount of potting soil he bought last week. Answer the following questions to find the number of pounds of soil Emmanuel purchased last week. (a) What is the unknown information? hint : Do we know what Emmanuel purchased last week?

  104. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeswe do

  105. perl
    • one year ago
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    Please show me where that is given :)

  106. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Emmanuel bought 40 lb of potting soil this week

  107. perl
    • one year ago
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    That is the amount for this week, not last week.

  108. perl
    • one year ago
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    Do we know how much he bought last week? if we don't know, that is the 'unknown'

  109. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Unknowkn = x

  110. perl
    • one year ago
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    The question asks what is the unknown information. Can you be more specific about what x represents?

  111. perl
    • one year ago
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    in the context of this problem

  112. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay Not getting

  113. perl
    • one year ago
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    Let's go over the directions again . Read it carefully `Emmanuel bought 40 lb of potting soil this week. This amount is 4 lb more than three times the amount of potting soil he bought last week. ` a) What is the unknown information? Do we know how much soil he bought this week? yes Do we know how much soil he bought last week? no

  114. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so the Anwser is...

  115. perl
    • one year ago
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    I can only guide you, I can't give you the direct answer.

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