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anonymous

  • one year ago

How to find the state of polarization of a wave ?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @xboxliveyolobrother

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    anwser choices?

  3. paki
    • one year ago
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    The completely general way to represent a polarized wave is via the unit helicity vectors :)

  4. paki
    • one year ago
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    http://prntscr.com/7momiz

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh ok yea what he said ok hold on i can solve this ok ill give paki a medal he'll give you a medal and you give me a medal it will all wrk out

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    unit helicity vector? please delineate

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    http://prntscr.com/7monrl @paki

  8. perl
    • one year ago
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    *

  9. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    both look linearly polarized along line y = -x, if you add the vectors. same magnitudes, same phase. and though the (kx - wt) formulation in example 2 looks somewhat odd to me, shouldn't matter

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Try not to get lost in all the stuff inside the cosine and sine functions. In trigonometry we learn that cosine and sine are just bouncing back and forth between 1 and -1. So when we plug in the max and min values of each function we can start to paint a picture of whats happening here. [NOTE: gotta remember that i and j stand for x and y respectively, they are components of the total E vector.] When you plug 1 in for both cosines in the first equation you see the x (or "i") component remains positive while the y (or "j") component becomes negative. When you plug -1 in for both cosines (again just the first eq) x becomes a negative component and y a positive component. This helps show why the electrical wave is linearly polarized along the line y=-x. To more rigorously prove this I would suggest looking up JONES MATRICES and using that mathematical process in the future.

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