anonymous
  • anonymous
This is Microbiology, but couldn't find the subject. Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (vrsa) was isolated from the exit site of a dialysis catheter in a 40-year-old diabetic with a history of periphreal vascular disease, chronic renal failure, and chronic foot ulcers. A few months earlier, the patient's gangrenous toe had been amputated. Following that surgery, the patient developed bacteremia. Vancomycin, rifampin, and graft removal successfully treated to infection. A few months later, when the catheter exit site infection appeared, the are was cultured & the catheter removed,
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Hello welcome to open study!
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont think she is new
anonymous
  • anonymous
successfully treating the infection. A week later the patient's chronic foot ulcer again appeared infected. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE) and Klebsiella oxytoca were cultured from the ulcer. The patient recovered after wound care and systemic treatment with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxozale.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
Analysis of the VRSA isolate revealed that it contained the van A gene for vancomycin resistance and the mec A gene for oxacillin resistance. -How do you think the Staphylococcus aureus strain ended up with the gene for vancomycin resistance? -What is one possible mechanism for genetic transfer of antibiotic resistance from one organism to another? -Why would this particular patient be at increased rick for infection with VRSA? -Provide a detailed explanation of how genes, such as those responsible for drug resistance, be transferred between bacterial species? -Where could S. aureus likely have acquired the genes for drug resistance? and -What do we call infections that are acquired in a medical setting AND how are they tracked within hospital facilities?
anonymous
  • anonymous
What do you think?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think for the first question the S.aureus strain ended up with the gene for vancomycin when the patient developed the bacreremia. The second one I'm at a loss for. The third one I think the patient would be at an increased risk because of the resistances (is that even a word? lol) the patient has. The fourth one I'm also at a loss for. The fifth one, isn't that like the first question? And i'm not sure about the last one.
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
you are on the right track. gene transfer occur from one bacteria to another and then self-mutation may have happened. Usually, complete treatment does not involve 100% success and may have still missed a few bacteria that have mutated during its growth and produced characteristics already resistant to the treatment.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.