cassieforlife5
  • cassieforlife5
How to find final momentum of inelastic collision? I'm doing an activity for physics and I have to find the final momentum after two items collide in an inelastic collision. I have the two initial momentums and two final momentums, but the sheet is only looking for one final momentum. Do I add the two final momentums to get the final momentum?
Physics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this
and thousands of other questions

IrishBoy123
  • IrishBoy123
yes just remember momentum is a vector so it has direction
IrishBoy123
  • IrishBoy123
and it should equal the total initial momentum (or your experiment has discovered a new law)!!!
Michele_Laino
  • Michele_Laino
I think that you have to make the vector sum of the two final momentums. Please also check that vector sum has to be equal to the vector sum of the two initial momentums

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

asib1214
  • asib1214
asib1214
  • asib1214
how do i find the amplitde
ybarrap
  • ybarrap
Convert this to a sine wave with Amplitude on y-axis, time on x-axis: |dw:1435610998159:dw| \(A\) is amplitude (in cm) \(T\) is period (in seconds) or number of seconds per cycle Frequency is \(\frac{1}{T}\) Hz or number of cycles per second Peak-to-Peak is 18 cm so amplitude is half of this It takes 3 seconds to move the block 3 cycles so, $$ 3T=6~\text{seconds} $$ Solve for T In one cycle, the block has moved 18 cm In 3 cycles it has moved three times that distance Does this make sense?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@asib1214 The amplitude in your problem is the distance the weight has moved from rest to the furthest stretched out point of the spring. This is also the same distance from the block's resting point to the point where the spring is fully compressed. In your picture the distance between the points where the spring is fully compressed and fully stretched is 18cm. ybarrap gave an excellent picture to help explain this idea mathematically. Halfway between where the spring is fully compressed and fully stretched is the natural "resting point" of the mass and thats why you need to divide 18 by 2 for your answer.
IrishBoy123
  • IrishBoy123
hang on a minute!!! one thread has simply appeared inside another magic? or maybe a bit rude?
asib1214
  • asib1214
it's aight i've created my own equation to find the amplitude....A= total distance X N (number of cycles)/total time....so it'll be 18 cm X 3 cycles/ 6 seconds = 9 cm

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.