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anonymous

  • one year ago

Find the LCM of each set of polynomials 12y^2 6x^2

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  1. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Work with the numbers first, then with the variables.

  2. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    What do 6 and 12 have in common?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    They have 6 in common

  4. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Correct. What do you see in common in the two expanded expressions? |dw:1435626979235:dw|

  5. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435627070565:dw|

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have done the problem many times but do not get the same as the answer in the book

  7. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Sorry. I was doing the GCF. You need the LCM.

  8. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Let me do it again.

  9. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    For the LCM, you need to find all the prime factors, and then you use common factors with larger exponents and non-common factors too.

  10. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Let's find the prime factors of both expressions: |dw:1435627198633:dw|

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay I get up to this part then I don't known were to go from there

  12. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Ok. Now we have the prime factors of each expression. Now we need to use common and not common factors with the larger exponent. I'll do one by one and will explain what that means.

  13. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435627321296:dw|

  14. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Now we look at the next factor. |dw:1435627412226:dw|

  15. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435627464634:dw|

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I get it OMG thanks u saved my day 😂

  17. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435627511318:dw|