HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
Use of Diction & Connotation in each paragraph of the Story The Calypso Borealis Bu John Muir
English
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
katieb
  • katieb
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HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
After earning a few dollars working on my brother-in law's farm near Portage [Wisconsin], I set off on the first of my long lonely excursions, botanising in glorious freedom around the Great Lakes and wandering through innumerable tamarac and arbor-vitae swamps, and forests of maple, basswood, ash, elm, balsam, fir, pine, spruce, hemlock, rejoicing in their bound wealth and strength and beauty, climbing the trees, revelling in their flowers and fruit like bees in beds of goldenrods, glorying in the fresh cool beauty and charm of the bog and meadow heathworts, grasses, carices, ferns, mosses, liverworts displayed in boundless profusion. The rarest and most beautiful of the flowering plants I discovered on this first grand excursion was Calypso borealis (the Hider of the North). I had been fording streams more and more difficult to cross and wading bogs and swamps that seemed more and more extensive and more difficult to force one's way through. Entering one of these great tamarac and arbor-vitae swamps one morning, holding a general though very crooked course by compass, struggling through tangled drooping branches and over and under broad heaps of fallen trees, I began to fear that I would not be able to reach dry ground before dark, and therefore would have to pass the night in the swamp and began, faint and hungry, to plan a nest of branches on one of the largest trees or windfalls like a monkey's nest, or eagle's, or Indian's in the flooded forests of the Orinoco described by Humboldt. But when the sun was getting low and everything seemed most bewildering and discouraging, I found beautiful Calypso on the mossy bank of a stream, growing not in the ground but on a bed of yellow mosses in which its small white bulb had found a soft nest and from which its one leaf and one flower sprung. The flower was white and made the impression of the utmost simple purity like a snowflower. No other bloom was near it, for the bog a short distance below the surface was still frozen, and the water was ice cold. It seemed the most spiritual of all the flower people I had ever met. I sat down beside it and fairly cried for joy. It seems wonderful that so frail and lovely a plant has such power over human hearts. This Calypso meeting happened some forty-five years ago, and it was more memorable and impressive than any of my meetings with human beings excepting, perhaps, Emerson and one or two others. When I was leaving the University, Professor J.D. Butler said, "John, I would like to know what becomes o you, and I wish you would write me, say once a year, so I may keep you in sight." I wrote to the Professor, telling him about this meeting with Calypso, and he sent the letter to an Eastern newspaper [The Boston Recorder] with some comments of his own. These, as far as I know, were the first of my words that appeared in print. How long I sat beside Calypso I don't know. Hunger and weariness vanished, and only after the sun was low in the west I splashed on through the swamp, strong and exhilarated as if never more to feel any mortal care. At length I saw maple woods on a hill and found a log house. I was gladly received. "Where ha ye come fra? The swamp, that awfu' swamp. What were ye doin' there?" etc. "Mony a puir body has been lost in that muckle, cauld, dreary bog and never been found." When I told her I had entered it in search of plants and had been in it all day, she wondered how plants could draw me to these awful places, and said, "It's god's mercy ye ever got out." Oftentimes I had to sleep without blankets, and sometimes without supper, but usually I had no great difficulty in finding a loaf of bread here and there at the houses of the farmer settlers in the widely scattered clearings. With one of these large backwoods loaves I was able to wander many a long wild fertile mile in the forests and bogs, free as the winds, gathering plants, and glorying in God's abounding inexhaustible spiritual beauty bread. Storms, thunderclouds, winds in the woods—were welcomed as friends.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Diction- words that author uses. This can be any rhetorical use of the English language Connotation-word or phrase that infers something beyond their literal meaning
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
I don't need to know the defection

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok. How about if I pull out some quotes for you:
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
ok I need places in the paragraph were he uses diction and connotation
OregonDuck
  • OregonDuck
this is what she needs to do
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok diction-line 12 "more and more difficult to cross" He uses repetition of the word "more" to emphasize the diffculty
anonymous
  • anonymous
That reveals his repetitive nature of diction
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
what paragraph is that in?
anonymous
  • anonymous
second
anonymous
  • anonymous
line twelve of second paragraph
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
paragraph 3 next?
anonymous
  • anonymous
As to the connotation "glorying in thenature" on paragraph 1 on the line 7th
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
I have one already that given to be already
anonymous
  • anonymous
that's a connoation
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
Great. Just to add to your learning, denotation is the opposite of connotation
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
I need paragraph 3,4,5
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
go look at @OregonDuck 's question too
anonymous
  • anonymous
made the impression of uptmost purity-paragraph 3 line 5
anonymous
  • anonymous
that's a connotation
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
now diction
anonymous
  • anonymous
water was ice cold-line 7 paragraph 3 His denotative nature of diction.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The quote above reveals his denotative nature of diction. You may also say this is a metaphor as it's being compared to the temperature of the ice. Either way this quote reveals his diction
anonymous
  • anonymous
"So frail and lovely a plant" instead of saying "this frail and lovely plant" paragraph 4 line 1. This reveals his "emphatic" diction. Regardless of the way in which one perceives this quote it is a distinct English usage to use adjective before noun.
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
hey everyone that is on here go on @OregonDuck I will be going their so follow me
anonymous
  • anonymous
"It was more impressive and memorable than any of my meetings with human beings" line 3 of paragraph 4. This is a connotation. One would infer that he hasn't had great experience with other humans.
anonymous
  • anonymous
"How long I sad beside Calypso I don't know" line 1 paragraph 5=connotation This leaves the reader to ponder how long exactly he sat beside Calypso. As he doesn't remember it could be really long, or otherwise depending on the interpretation of the reader.
anonymous
  • anonymous
"As if never to feel any mortal care" - Diction This quote reveals his rhetorical use of the ENglish language compared to the standard comtemporary literature. Therefore as I said any form of writing that is distinct from our every day language is a very acceptable diction. I guess I answered and explained all of your qustions:) Cheers and good night
OregonDuck
  • OregonDuck
cheers mate

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