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anonymous

  • one year ago

can someone help me with these chem questions ? thanks Which statement describes the trend in first ionization energy for elements on the periodic table? It generally decreases down a group because valence electrons are farther from the nucleus. It generally decreases across a period because effective nuclear charge decreases. It generally increases down a group because valence electrons are farther from the nucleus. It generally increases across a period because effective nuclear charge decreases.

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  1. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Going across a period on the periodic table we're adding a proton, so Zeff goes up as well as electronegativity. As electronegativity goes up across a period, it becomes harder for you to remove an electron as we go L/R. some exceptions to this are the transition metals. from my understanding, as you go down a group what's happening is that you're increasing the number of shells in your atoms, i.e atomic radius gets bigger but now the valence electrons become farther from the nucleus and the pull of the nucleus is not as effective so as you go down a group it becomes easier to remove electrons, i.e. valence electrons are farther from nucleus. so i would say the ionization energy decreases down a group.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336 so whats the answer a,b,c or d?

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    a. It generally decreases down a group because valence electrons are farther from the nucleus.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thanks :) can you answer another one?

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    long story short valence electrons farther from nucleus so easier remove

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yeah sure

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What is the trend in electronegativity for elements on the periodic table? It decreases across a period and increases down a group. It decreases across a period and decreases down a group. It increases across a period and increases down a group. It increases across a period and decreases down a group.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336

  9. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    increases across a period and decreases down a group.

  10. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @jammy987 do you know why?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yea thanks

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you answer another one? @Photon336

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What is the trend in effective nuclear charge for elements on the periodic table? It decreases across a period but is constant down a group. It increases across a period but is constant down a group. It is constant across a period but decreases down a group. It is constant across a period but increases down a group.

  14. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    it's definitely not constant across a period

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so the answer would be @Photon336 ?

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    increases across a period but is constant down a group

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    last one How does the atomic radius change as you move down a group on the periodic table? It decreases because additional valence electrons are farther from the nucleus. It decreases because additional valence electrons experience more shielding. It increases because additional valence electrons are farther from the nucleus. It increases because additional valence electrons experience more shielding.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336

  19. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    moving down a group... it definitely increases b/c additional valence electrons are farther from the nucleus

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    On the periodic table, the number of valence electrons in atoms increases left to right across a period. What effect does this have on the ionic radii of the elements? It decreases across cations and decreases across anions. It decreases across cations and increases across anions. It increases across cations and decreases across anions. It increases across cations and increases across anions.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and thanks so much your a lifesaver ! @Photon336

  22. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yeah no problem! let me see that last one

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    On the periodic table, the number of valence electrons in atoms increases left to right across a period. What effect does this have on the ionic radii of the elements? It decreases across cations and decreases across anions. It decreases across cations and increases across anions. It increases across cations and decreases across anions. It increases across cations and increases across anions.

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336

  25. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I think for that one it would be adding electrons so it should increase across anions, decrease cations..

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it wasnt that @Photon336

  27. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    which one? the last question?

  28. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    oh crap it said ionic radii! i missed that

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yea @Photon336

  30. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    In general A cation is positively charged, meaning that it is an atom that has lost an electron or electrons. The positive charge of the nucleus is thus distributed over a smaller number of electrons and electron-electron repulsion is decreased, meaning that the electrons are held more tightly and the atomic radius is smaller than in the normal neutral atom. Anions, conversely, are negatively charged ions: atoms that have gained electrons. In anions, electron-electron repulsion increases and the positive charge of the nucleus is distributed over a larger number of electrons. Anions have a greater atomic radius than the neutral atom from which they derive. if you're adding electrons it should increase across both.. for this i'm not too sure.

  31. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    let me know if that's correct

  32. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @jammy987

  33. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    if that's not the right answer, I'll tag someone who may know

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay @Photon336

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it wasnt right

  36. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @sweetburger can you help with this question: On the periodic table, the number of valence electrons in atoms increases left to right across a period. What effect does this have on the ionic radii of the elements? It decreases across cations and decreases across anions. It decreases across cations and increases across anions. It increases across cations and decreases across anions. It increases across cations and increases across anions

  37. sweetburger
    • one year ago
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    It will decrease for cations as the atom loses an electron so the overall nuclear charge on the electrons becomes stronger causing a decreases in size. It will increase across anions as there is a gain of electron on the atom and therefore the effective nuclear charge is not as strong due to the extra electron shielding so the atomic radius decreases.

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @sweetburger so the answer would be?

  39. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Was confused myself with this question lol.. I may have misinterpreted it. Cation implies a stronger nuclear charge and smaller atomic radius. So it should decrease with cation.. But for an anion it gains an electron so that (but I was unsure because aren't we going across a period # of shells isn't increasing..)

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