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chris215

  • one year ago

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    use the formula D=RT

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes correct so you would divide what to get T by its self

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hmmmm

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is that -7.5 minutes per second

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh ok

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    my best guess would be 6 seconds

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what i would do is use the formula that i showed you and plug in the numbers but just to make sure im not giving you the wrong answer im going to have my friend help you @Elsa213

  8. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    A car moving with a speed of 108 km/h is brought to rest in a distance of 60 m. The car's acceleration is -7.5 m/s/s. How much time did the car take to stop? So the initial velocity of the car is 108 km/h and it's brought to rest in a distance of 60m and the cars acceleration is -7.5 m/s^2 t = ? Now we have the formula \[d= v_0 t + 1/2 at^2\] now put it together.

  9. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    No it doesn't, but this formula may be a bit too difficult for you atm as you would have to use quadratic formula, lets just make it simple on ourselves and use \[v_f = v_i + at\]

  10. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Now solve for t

  11. chris215
    • one year ago
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    whats final and initial velocity thought

  12. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    You should be able to figure that out, I actually posted it above.

  13. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    The point of this problem is for you to figure out if you know all the quantities and what they mean.

  14. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Try setting it up, make sure you solve for t, and note that you have to convert your units to m/s!! Try it out and if you get it wrong, don't worry I will help you then.

  15. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Ok, so reading this question `A car moving with a speed of 108 km/h is brought to rest in a distance of 60 m.` Notice how it says the car is brought to REST in a distance of 60m, so it's final velocity = 0, as it's at rest, and initial is 108 km/h.

  16. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    You have to convert the 108 km/h though to m/s

  17. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    This is why I said we need to read it carefully earlier :P

  18. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Right on, now solve for t.

  19. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yup 4s is good!

  20. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Np :)

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