A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

Why do BF3 and NH3 bond together to form BF3NH3 if boron only needs 6 valence electrons? If boron is happy with 6, then why would it create a double covalent bond with nitrogen that has a lone pair of electrons?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I think Boron is an exception, it has an empty p orbital that can accept electrons.

  2. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Boron is also a strong Lewis acid meaning that it can accept a pair of electrons in what's known as a coordinate covalent bond

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The bond happens when both the electrons come from the same atom, in this case nitrogen.

  4. aaronq
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it doesn't create a double bond with nitrogen, it's a single bond. It's all about that empty p orbital though |dw:1435764939354:dw|

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh so when they bond, nitrogen donates one electron to boron and because now they have opposite charges they are attracted to each other similar to how an ionic bond is formed?

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @coltonpalmer an ionic bond is when there's a transfer of electrons, electrostatic attraction; this case is different because it's not an ionic bond but rather a coordinate covalent bond, note "covalent". The issue here is that boron is one of those exceptions, but the best way to think of it is as a Lewis acid; Lewis base pair where the electrons are coming from the nitrogen. Boron is a bit funny because it's one of those exceptions. A Lewis acid by definition is an atom that can accept a pair of electrons.

  7. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    But I guess you could think of it that way just remember that it's not ionic.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok thank you :) @Photon336 @aaronq

  9. aaronq
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The charges are formal charges, not ionic.

  10. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.