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anonymous

  • one year ago

Write an equation of hte line, in point-slope form, that passes through the two given points. points(-15, 7)(5,-3) (posting picture of answers)

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I picked answer C

  3. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    m = y2-y1/x2-x1 = -10/20 = - 1/2 so yeah, that's the only one with an M value of -1/2

  4. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    id go C too ;)

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yay! I get so happy when I get math questions right. :P I'm bad at math. I have 2 more(including this one) i'm not sure of

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  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is the last one

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  7. sepeario
    • one year ago
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    like @Jack1 did, or you could firstly work out the gradient, and substitute the values into a point gradient formula.

  8. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    a) \(\large y = -16x^2 +15 +110x\) do you know how to find the derivative of this? (y')

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no..

  10. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    hmmm... k k well idk how else to do it, sorry so: \(\Large y = -16x^2 +15 +110x\) \(\Large y = -16x^{\color{red}{2}} +110x^{\color{blue}{1}} +15x^\color{green}{0}\) \(\Large y' = \color{red}{2} \times-16x^{\color{red}{2}-1} + \color{blue}{1} \times 110x^{\color{blue}{1}-1} +\color{green}{0} \times 15x^{\color{green}{0}-1} \) \(\Large y' = \color{red}{-32x^1} + \color{blue}{110x^0} + \color{green}{0}\) \(\Large y' = \color{red}{-32x^1} + \color{blue}{110} \) this is the gradient

  11. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435739203953:dw|

  12. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    \(\large y′=−32x+110\) gradient = 0 at the turning point (highest point) \(\large 0=−32x+110\) \(\large -110=−32x\) \(\large -110/-32=x\) so the time it takes to get to the highest point = 110/32 = 3.44 seconds (ish)

  13. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    does this make sense? @kimberlyalice

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes it does

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry, I had to go eat breakfast cause I'm fasting so it's really early in the morning.

  16. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    nah, chill, all good, i'm makin snacks now too, freakin starving sweet, so if it reaches the peak ht at 3.44 seconds... how long from when its fired to when it hits the ground?

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Would the peak height be about half the entire path of the object?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    About 7 seconds

  19. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    yeps, perfect so only 1 answer has 7 seconds

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That means I was right!! This is so exciting!

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    THANK YOU!

  22. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    well... 1 sensible answer B is kinda low, sáll 3.4 feet isnt very high

  23. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    weait i didnt finish omg im so sorry :(

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It's okay. I jumped too quickly :)

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Is it A? The height is higher

  26. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    yep, a to prove: just plug x =3.44 into first equation y=−16x2+15+110x y = height = 204.06

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ahh, I see! Thank you!

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Can you help me with the last one?

  29. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    b) ??? maybe, will try.... so the difference each time is -3 7... -3 = 4... -3 = 1... -3 = -2... etc... but it's supposed to be recursive... so doesnt that mean it eventually comes back to 7?

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I believe so..

  31. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    Recursion is the process of choosing a starting term and repeatedly applying the same process to each term to arrive at the following term. Recursion requires that you know the value of the term immediately before the term you are trying to find.

  32. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    i'm out then, sorry :(

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you help me @UsukiDoll

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it's okay @Jack1

  35. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    how do i medal u @UsukiDoll ? sorry ive given mine away for this q already

  36. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    er.. who has medal who though?

  37. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    and a user can't medal 2 people at the same time :/

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I can start a new question and you can give a medal @Jack1

  39. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    k that sounds good.

  40. Jack1
    • one year ago
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    do it!

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