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anonymous

  • one year ago

I will give fan and medal. Tile setters use small tiles in the shape of hexagons to create all sorts of decorative patterns. In the pattern below, a central red tile is surrounded by bigger and bigger six-sided rings of colored tiles. Only three colored rings are shown, but larger rings of white tiles surround the ones you see here.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    http://media.apexlearning.com/Images/200511/02/4747541b-49fc-4b82-9383-b4ad1f0da2bd.gif

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Construct a sequence of numbers in the following way: First, write down the number of red tiles (1). Then count and write down the number of blue tiles (the next ring out). Then write the number of yellow tiles, the number of green tiles, and so on. The sequence you build in this way is not an arithmetic sequence. A. True B. False

  3. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    @adsfghgdfsf Can you start by creating a sequence of numbers. Each number represents the number of hexagonal tiles in each ring, starting from the inside, it goes like: 1, 6, .... Can you complete two or three more numbers of the sequence?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it will be 1,6,9,12

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathmate

  6. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    In math, it would be a good idea to check every step of your work to avoid mistakes. Would you like to recheck your two numbers added by actually counting every tile around the previous ring?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i guess

  8. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    The picture is right there for you to count, there is no need to guess!

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so the answer is false

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