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anonymous

  • one year ago

D(5, 7), E(4, 3), F(8, 2), form the vertices of a triangle . what is m<DEF ?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    30° 45° 60° 90° HELP 😩

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Plot it out on graph and use the distance formula to get the three sides and then you can use Cosine Law to figure out the angles.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Have you learned about Cosine Law?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No & I have no paper . I'm doing Plato .

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    here is the graph:

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  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    😵😵 where the points ? Or how do I read this graph 😨

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    They did not give you a distance for none of the sides so to me it looks like you need to find the sides and use Cosine Law, which you can find the sides using he distance formula Here are your points https://www.desmos.com/calculator/zbzs1dzyyp

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I dont understand what the question means @Nixy, what is m<DEF?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Measurement of angle DEF ?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    & I would type cos .... I'm confused

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sorry, normally slope is indicated by the letter m, so wasnt sure!

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    need to explain rationale for using cosine law to @Jade3115

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm being timed 😩 so I'm going to have to guess

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Timed?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I've spent 15 mins on one question .

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    distance formula = \( \sqrt{(x_2 - x_1)^2+(y_2- y_1)^2} \) D(5, 7), E(4, 3), F(8, 2) So from E(4,3) to D (5,7) \( \sqrt{(5 - 4)^2+(7- 3)^2} \) That will give you the distance from E to D and that is one side.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Who is timing you?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The computer

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do I pit cos before that ? @nixy

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Jade, there is a lot of work to do with this problem and to me you have to KNow about the distance formula and Cosine Law so this is going to take a little bit.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ugh. Thanks anyway .

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do you understand the distance formula?

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No. I don't understand none of this stuf . That's why I'm doing this now

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    why use the distance formula when answers are degrees?

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    😂😂

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You need the sides to get the degree. ONce you have the sides you can use Cosine Law to get the degrees

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay @Jade3115 is suggesting that the angle you are looking for is opposite one of the sides.|dw:1435458749504:dw|

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ha!, what @Jade3115 forgot to mention was that you were not given the lengths of the sides or any angles.

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry, I am at work so I am in and out :-) @BPDlkeme234 That is why I suggested to her to use the distance formula first to find the sides and then she can use Cosine Law to find the angles

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have just become a fan of @Jade3115 knowing where she was going with this.

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Once she has the the sides she can use formulas like the following to find the angles \[ \huge cos^{-1} E = \frac{b^2+c^2-a^2}{-2bc} \] To find the

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But this solution obviously mean calculating the sides, as @Jade3115 said. Her solution was right.

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How was her solution correct? She did not have a solution. I am the one that told her she had to calculate the sides and then told her how and from there she has to use Cosine Law to figure the angles. The only solution she had was to guess at a random answer.

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