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Which text feature provides explanatory information? Title Sidebar Subheading Image
English
katieb
  • katieb
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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anonymous
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sidebar
anonymous
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100% sure
anonymous
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next.

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A student is revising the sentence below: The prosecuting attorney instructed the members of the jury to remain detached from the defendant because the judge did not want them to hear the man's story and become sympathetic toward him. Based on the context of this sentence, which is the best synonym for detached? Hostile: openly opposed or resisting Objective: marked by judgment of facts; unemotional Unapproachable: too unfriendly to approach Unfriendly: hostile; bad-tempered
anonymous
  • anonymous
objective
anonymous
  • anonymous
good one
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The Mystery of Loch Ness By Kayden Mitchell Of all the mysteries in the world, none has been as popular as that of the Loch Ness Monster. Perhaps the biggest mystery is whether it is convincing evidence or a simple desire to believe that keeps the myth alive. Loch Ness is a lake in Scotland. The loch, or lake, is known for sightings of a mysterious monster. Most who see this monster, known as Nessie, describe something with a long neck and several humps above the water. Sometimes the "monster" is moving in these sightings, and sometimes it is still. Many have suggested that Nessie might be a plesiosaur (plea-see-a-soar), an aquatic dinosaur that was trapped in the loch after the last ice age. The plesiosaur theory presents several problems. First, the plesiosaur is an air breather. Such a creature would need to surface often and, therefore, be seen more frequently. Second, it's unlikely that the same creature has lived in the loch since the last ice age. Today's creature would have to be the offspring of an original plesiosaur trapped long ago. This would suggest multiple creatures in the loch (needed to produce offspring). Again, sightings would be more frequent if this were the case. So from a purely logical stand point, the existence of such a large and ancient creature is unlikely. But assume for a minute that it is possible. What would a plesiosaur need to live in an enclosed lake? •Tropical waters: Scientists believe plesiosaurs were warm-blooded. Like crocodiles and alligators, plesiosaurs would need to live in warm waters. The loch is very cold with temperatures averaging about 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4 Celsius). •Food: Like other warm-blooded creatures, plesiosaurs would need a large quantity of food. If there is a group of Nessies, then even more food would be needed. Because the loch is full of silt (underwater dust) not much light gets into the deepest areas. So the food chain, which would depend on plankton, is very weak at its base. As a result, there is probably not enough food to support such a large creature. However, the plesiosaur theory is not the only one. Many other ideas attempt to explain the sightings and "photographs." But two separate sonar surveys of the loch have not found any evidence of a creature larger than a salmon. The last survey1, completed in 2007 by the British Broadcasting Company (BBC), involved 600 different sonar beams. Using satellite navigation systems, the team made sure every inch of the loch was searched. The team found nothing. With cell phones and digital cameras, one would think that sightings of Nessie would increase. This has not happened. The BBC team believes the legend of Nessie has endured because people see what they want to see. To prove this, the team used a fence post, raising it before groups of tourists. Afterwards several of the tourists asked to draw pictures of what they had seen drew pictures of a monster's head. 1 "BBC 'proves' Nessie does not exist." 27 July, 2003. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3096839.stm Read this sentence from the essay: So from a purely logical stand point, the existence of such a large and ancient creature is unlikely. Based on the text, what does the phrase a purely logical stand point mean? A. A point of view based on sound reasons and valid conclusion B. A position that is most easy to defend and protect from critics C. A simplified point of view on a controversial issue D. A structured argument from which evidence can be pulled
anonymous
  • anonymous
a
anonymous
  • anonymous
mark my word my friend.
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YOU ROCK! I DON'T KNOW HOW TO REPAY YOU! I have more tho.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Go ahead.
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Which situation would work best with a first-person narrator? When the writer has a cast of many characters to develop When the writer has only a short time to focus on character When the writer is most concerned with plot and not character development When the writer wants readers to identify strongly with one character
anonymous
  • anonymous
Last one.
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Listen to this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6Sxv-sUYtM
anonymous
  • anonymous
Shiz I don't have microphone
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can you summarize?
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For what?
anonymous
  • anonymous
The link to youtube.
anonymous
  • anonymous
When the writer wants the reader to strongly identify with one character. you got that part?
Flvs.net
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Oh, it was the song Happy by Pharell.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh great! So you done with the exam?
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No. :( Ten more questions. >_<
anonymous
  • anonymous
No place to hide. Let's go
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You made my day!! :D You deserve a medal for this. I am about to start crying.
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Read the excerpt below and then answer the question that follows: The Book of Dragons Chapter III The Deliverers of Their Country, an excerpt By E. Nesbit It all began with Effie's getting something in her eye. It hurt very much indeed, and it felt something like a red-hot spark—only it seemed to have legs as well, and wings like a fly. Effie rubbed and cried—not real crying, but the kind your eye does all by itself without your being miserable inside your mind—and then she went to her father to have the thing in her eye taken out. Effie's father was a doctor, so of course he knew how to take things out of eyes. When he had gotten the thing out, he said: "This is very curious." Effie had often got things in her eye before, and her father had always seemed to think it was natural—rather tiresome and naughty perhaps, but still natural. He had never before thought it curious. Effie stood holding her handkerchief to her eye, and said: "I don't believe it's out." People always say this when they have had something in their eyes. "Oh, yes—it's out," said the doctor. "Here it is, on the brush. This is very interesting." Effie had never heard her father say that about anything that she had any share in. She said: "What?" The doctor carried the brush very carefully across the room, and held the point of it under his microscope—then he twisted the brass screws of the microscope, and looked through the top with one eye. "Dear me," he said. "Dear, dear me! Four well-developed limbs; a long caudal appendage; five toes, unequal in lengths, almost like one of the Lacertidae, yet there are traces of wings." The creature under his eye wriggled a little in the castor oil, and he went on: "Yes; a bat-like wing. A new specimen, undoubtedly. Effie, run round to the professor and ask him to be kind enough to step in for a few minutes." "You might give me sixpence, Daddy," said Effie, "because I did bring you the new specimen. I took great care of it inside my eye, and my eye does hurt." The doctor was so pleased with the new specimen that he gave Effie a shilling, and presently the professor stepped round. He stayed to lunch, and he and the doctor quarreled very happily all the afternoon about the name and the family of the thing that had come out of Effie's eye. But at teatime another thing happened. Effie's brother Harry fished something out of his tea, which he thought at first was an earwig. He was just getting ready to drop it on the floor, and end its life in the usual way, when it shook itself in the spoon—spread two wet wings, and flopped onto the tablecloth. There it sat, stroking itself with its feet and stretching its wings, and Harry said: "Why, it's a tiny newt!" The professor leaned forward before the doctor could say a word. "I'll give you half a crown for it, Harry, my lad," he said, speaking very fast; and then he picked it up carefully on his handkerchief. "It is a new specimen," he said, "and finer than yours, Doctor." It was a tiny lizard, about half an inch long—with scales and wings. So now the doctor and the professor each had a specimen, and they were both very pleased. But before long these specimens began to seem less valuable. For the next morning, when the knife-boy was cleaning the doctor's boots, he suddenly dropped the brushes and the boot and the blacking, and screamed out that he was burnt. And from inside the boot came crawling a lizard as big as a kitten, with large, shiny wings. "Why," said Effie, "I know what it is. It is a dragon like the one St. George killed." And Effie was right. That afternoon Towser was bitten in the garden by a dragon about the size of a rabbit, which he had tried to chase, and the next morning all the papers were full of the wonderful "winged lizards" that were appearing all over the country. The papers would not call them dragons, because, of course, no one believes in dragons nowadays—and at any rate the papers were not going to be so silly as to believe in fairy stories. At first there were only a few, but in a week or two the country was simply running alive with dragons of all sizes, and in the air you could sometimes see them as thick as a swarm of bees. They all looked alike except as to size. They were green with scales, and they had four legs and a long tail and great wings like bats' wings, only the wings were a pale, half-transparent yellow, like the gear-boxes on bicycles. Which describes the effect of having multiple incidents with the “specimens” in this section of the story? It suggests a childlike awe. It suggests a growing creature. It suggests a lack of concern. It suggests a sense of chaos.
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Are you there?
anonymous
  • anonymous
last one
anonymous
  • anonymous
took me a while to read the whole story
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Which sentence uses correct punctuation? We always enjoy the beach on a bright, sunny day. We always enjoy the beach, on a bright sunny day. We always, enjoy the beach on a bright sunny day. We always enjoy the beach on a bright sunny, day.
anonymous
  • anonymous
second one
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A student is revising the sentence below: As soon as our children were out of diapers, we moved them out of the city to the suburbs, where the schools were better and life was more simple and wholesome. Which word would be the best replacement for the word wholesome? Hearty Impure Natural Nutritious
anonymous
  • anonymous
natural
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Which sentence is correctly punctuated? A. "Give me that book now," he said. Punching the air with his fist. B. "Give me that book now," he said punching the air with his fist. C. "Give me that book now," he said, punching the air with his fist. D. "Give me that book now" he said, punching the air with his fist.
anonymous
  • anonymous
C
anonymous
  • anonymous
change the answer to B for the long passage question where they talked about specimens.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok?
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The Mystery of Loch Ness By Kayden Mitchell Of all the mysteries in the world, none has been as popular as that of the Loch Ness Monster. Perhaps the biggest mystery is whether it is convincing evidence or a simple desire to believe that keeps the myth alive. Loch Ness is a lake in Scotland. The loch, or lake, is known for sightings of a mysterious monster. Most who see this monster, known as Nessie, describe something with a long neck and several humps above the water. Sometimes the "monster" is moving in these sightings, and sometimes it is still. Many have suggested that Nessie might be a plesiosaur (plea-see-a-soar), an aquatic dinosaur that was trapped in the loch after the last ice age. The plesiosaur theory presents several problems. First, the plesiosaur is an air breather. Such a creature would need to surface often and, therefore, be seen more frequently. Second, it's unlikely that the same creature has lived in the loch since the last ice age. Today's creature would have to be the offspring of an original plesiosaur trapped long ago. This would suggest multiple creatures in the loch (needed to produce offspring). Again, sightings would be more frequent if this were the case. So from a purely logical stand point, the existence of such a large and ancient creature is unlikely. But assume for a minute that it is possible. What would a plesiosaur need to live in an enclosed lake? •Tropical waters: Scientists believe plesiosaurs were warm-blooded. Like crocodiles and alligators, plesiosaurs would need to live in warm waters. The loch is very cold with temperatures averaging about 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4 Celsius). •Food: Like other warm-blooded creatures, plesiosaurs would need a large quantity of food. If there is a group of Nessies, then even more food would be needed. Because the loch is full of silt (underwater dust) not much light gets into the deepest areas. So the food chain, which would depend on plankton, is very weak at its base. As a result, there is probably not enough food to support such a large creature. However, the plesiosaur theory is not the only one. Many other ideas attempt to explain the sightings and "photographs." But two separate sonar surveys of the loch have not found any evidence of a creature larger than a salmon. The last survey1, completed in 2007 by the British Broadcasting Company (BBC), involved 600 different sonar beams. Using satellite navigation systems, the team made sure every inch of the loch was searched. The team found nothing. With cell phones and digital cameras, one would think that sightings of Nessie would increase. This has not happened. The BBC team believes the legend of Nessie has endured because people see what they want to see. To prove this, the team used a fence post, raising it before groups of tourists. Afterwards several of the tourists asked to draw pictures of what they had seen drew pictures of a monster's head. 1 "BBC 'proves' Nessie does not exist." 27 July, 2003. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3096839.stm Which describes the introduction to the essay? It has two paragraphs: one for the thesis and one for background. It has a wide focus: one that includes a variety of theories. It states a contradiction: one that the conclusion corrects. It states the main point: one that is not fully answered in the essay.
anonymous
  • anonymous
first
anonymous
  • anonymous
It has two paragraphs. One for thesis and one for background
Flvs.net
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Okay.
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Which of the following correctly combines the two sentences? She dusted the table. He vacuumed the rug. She dusted the table and he vacuumed the rug. She dusted the table, he vacuumed the rug. She dusted the table, and he vacuumed the rug. When she dusted the table he vacuumed the rug.
anonymous
  • anonymous
3
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What is the main purpose of the transition words in this sentence? Without a doubt, you need to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables each day. To indicate an example To summarize To fill a gap in information To emphasize
anonymous
  • anonymous
to fill a gap in information.
Flvs.net
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Which synonym best describes a person who is not upset during a loud and angry discussion? A. Gentle: lacking harshness or roughness B. Quiet: not making noise C. Restful: peaceful and quiet in a relaxing way D. Unruffled: calm during times of confusion
anonymous
  • anonymous
unruffled
Flvs.net
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The Mystery of Loch Ness By Kayden Mitchell Of all the mysteries in the world, none has been as popular as that of the Loch Ness Monster. Perhaps the biggest mystery is whether it is convincing evidence or a simple desire to believe that keeps the myth alive. Loch Ness is a lake in Scotland. The loch, or lake, is known for sightings of a mysterious monster. Most who see this monster, known as Nessie, describe something with a long neck and several humps above the water. Sometimes the "monster" is moving in these sightings, and sometimes it is still. Many have suggested that Nessie might be a plesiosaur (plea-see-a-soar), an aquatic dinosaur that was trapped in the loch after the last ice age. The plesiosaur theory presents several problems. First, the plesiosaur is an air breather. Such a creature would need to surface often and, therefore, be seen more frequently. Second, it's unlikely that the same creature has lived in the loch since the last ice age. Today's creature would have to be the offspring of an original plesiosaur trapped long ago. This would suggest multiple creatures in the loch (needed to produce offspring). Again, sightings would be more frequent if this were the case. So from a purely logical stand point, the existence of such a large and ancient creature is unlikely. But assume for a minute that it is possible. What would a plesiosaur need to live in an enclosed lake? •Tropical waters: Scientists believe plesiosaurs were warm-blooded. Like crocodiles and alligators, plesiosaurs would need to live in warm waters. The loch is very cold with temperatures averaging about 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4 Celsius). •Food: Like other warm-blooded creatures, plesiosaurs would need a large quantity of food. If there is a group of Nessies, then even more food would be needed. Because the loch is full of silt (underwater dust) not much light gets into the deepest areas. So the food chain, which would depend on plankton, is very weak at its base. As a result, there is probably not enough food to support such a large creature. However, the plesiosaur theory is not the only one. Many other ideas attempt to explain the sightings and "photographs." But two separate sonar surveys of the loch have not found any evidence of a creature larger than a salmon. The last survey1, completed in 2007 by the British Broadcasting Company (BBC), involved 600 different sonar beams. Using satellite navigation systems, the team made sure every inch of the loch was searched. The team found nothing. With cell phones and digital cameras, one would think that sightings of Nessie would increase. This has not happened. The BBC team believes the legend of Nessie has endured because people see what they want to see. To prove this, the team used a fence post, raising it before groups of tourists. Afterwards several of the tourists asked to draw pictures of what they had seen drew pictures of a monster's head. 1 "BBC 'proves' Nessie does not exist." 27 July, 2003. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3096839.stm What is the most likely explanation for the theory of Nessie being widely believed? This theory has more evidence than others. This theory has evidence that is hard to disprove. This theory is based on a real creature. This theory is typical of other theories
anonymous
  • anonymous
typical of other stories
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Which website would most likely offer the most reliable fact-based information about the invasive species in Florida habitats? Invasivespeciesinfo.gov Huffingtonpost.com Sciencetoday.com Blogs.pjstar.com
anonymous
  • anonymous
invasivespeciesinfo.gov
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Which transition would best connect the two sentences below? Many of these legends have some basis in history. We also know these stories of sightings have endured for centuries. Furthermore In contrast Nevertheless Therefore Two more questions after this one.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Furthermore
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Read the sentence below: Like a great rambling meat grinder, Godzilla clambers his way through cities, pulverizing buildings and leaving shreds of civilization clumped behind him. Which of the following correctly explains the purpose of the figurative language in this text? To give readers an image of what a large grinder would do to a city To give readers not familiar with Godzilla a way to imagine his effect To imply Godzilla has an awkward manner of movement To imply a meat grinder is more destructive than Godzilla
anonymous
  • anonymous
second
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LAST ONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Read the excerpt below and then answer the question that follows: The Book of Dragons Chapter III The Deliverers of Their Country, an excerpt By E. Nesbit It all began with Effie's getting something in her eye. It hurt very much indeed, and it felt something like a red-hot spark—only it seemed to have legs as well, and wings like a fly. Effie rubbed and cried—not real crying, but the kind your eye does all by itself without your being miserable inside your mind—and then she went to her father to have the thing in her eye taken out. Effie's father was a doctor, so of course he knew how to take things out of eyes. When he had gotten the thing out, he said: "This is very curious." Effie had often got things in her eye before, and her father had always seemed to think it was natural—rather tiresome and naughty perhaps, but still natural. He had never before thought it curious. Effie stood holding her handkerchief to her eye, and said: "I don't believe it's out." People always say this when they have had something in their eyes. "Oh, yes—it's out," said the doctor. "Here it is, on the brush. This is very interesting." Effie had never heard her father say that about anything that she had any share in. She said: "What?" The doctor carried the brush very carefully across the room, and held the point of it under his microscope—then he twisted the brass screws of the microscope, and looked through the top with one eye. "Dear me," he said. "Dear, dear me! Four well-developed limbs; a long caudal appendage; five toes, unequal in lengths, almost like one of the Lacertidae, yet there are traces of wings." The creature under his eye wriggled a little in the castor oil, and he went on: "Yes; a bat-like wing. A new specimen, undoubtedly. Effie, run round to the professor and ask him to be kind enough to step in for a few minutes." "You might give me sixpence, Daddy," said Effie, "because I did bring you the new specimen. I took great care of it inside my eye, and my eye does hurt." The doctor was so pleased with the new specimen that he gave Effie a shilling, and presently the professor stepped round. He stayed to lunch, and he and the doctor quarreled very happily all the afternoon about the name and the family of the thing that had come out of Effie's eye. But at teatime another thing happened. Effie's brother Harry fished something out of his tea, which he thought at first was an earwig. He was just getting ready to drop it on the floor, and end its life in the usual way, when it shook itself in the spoon—spread two wet wings, and flopped onto the tablecloth. There it sat, stroking itself with its feet and stretching its wings, and Harry said: "Why, it's a tiny newt!" The professor leaned forward before the doctor could say a word. "I'll give you half a crown for it, Harry, my lad," he said, speaking very fast; and then he picked it up carefully on his handkerchief. "It is a new specimen," he said, "and finer than yours, Doctor." It was a tiny lizard, about half an inch long—with scales and wings. So now the doctor and the professor each had a specimen, and they were both very pleased. But before long these specimens began to seem less valuable. For the next morning, when the knife-boy was cleaning the doctor's boots, he suddenly dropped the brushes and the boot and the blacking, and screamed out that he was burnt. And from inside the boot came crawling a lizard as big as a kitten, with large, shiny wings. "Why," said Effie, "I know what it is. It is a dragon like the one St. George killed." And Effie was right. That afternoon Towser was bitten in the garden by a dragon about the size of a rabbit, which he had tried to chase, and the next morning all the papers were full of the wonderful "winged lizards" that were appearing all over the country. The papers would not call them dragons, because, of course, no one believes in dragons nowadays—and at any rate the papers were not going to be so silly as to believe in fairy stories. At first there were only a few, but in a week or two the country was simply running alive with dragons of all sizes, and in the air you could sometimes see them as thick as a swarm of bees. They all looked alike except as to size. They were green with scales, and they had four legs and a long tail and great wings like bats' wings, only the wings were a pale, half-transparent yellow, like the gear-boxes on bicycles. What parts of the story—aside from the title—help develop the idea that the story will be about something fantastical? Be sure to include evidence from the story to support your answer.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The seventh paragraph, where the doctor gives full discription of the creature, implies that this story will be something fantastical. This is because the readers can then infer that the creature being scrutinized is indeed a classical dragon. From the quote "Yeah a bat-like wing, new speciemen undoubtedly" further serves to consolidate the reader's vision as to what is being examined; a classical dragon they've already met in countless other fantasy novels. Hence the said part helps develop the idea that story will be about something fantastical.
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THANK YOU SO MUCH!! YOU MADE MY DAY!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Good for you.
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76% not including the essay.
anonymous
  • anonymous
hahaha
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Bye! Thanks again!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I would appreciate if you can write a testimonial.
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I did.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Don't say I helped you just with answers but say I was helpful:)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am glad you passed the test though:) Congrats

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