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anonymous

  • one year ago

A parallelogram has an area of 14 cm 2. If the dimensions of the parallelogram are doubled, what will the new area be? 14 cm 2 28 cm 2 56 cm 2 112 cm 2 For a game, Tony has a rectangle drawn on a piece of paper that has an area of 18 in.2. What should he do to the dimensions in order to have a similar rectangle that's area is only 2 in.2? Divide them by nine. Divide them by six. Divide them by three. Multiply them by three.

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  1. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    you can take a square to demonstrate this.

  2. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435778829705:dw|

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ^^

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    idk

  5. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435778855063:dw|

  6. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    that is when all dimensions are doubled.

  7. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1435778929521:dw|

  8. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    you can see that when you doubled the dimensions your square got 4 times bigger, right?

  9. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    (same is true when doubling dimensions in a parallelogram)

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah ..

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i really suck at this stuff

  12. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    ok, so if you double the dimensions of a parallelogram your area will be 4 times bigger|dw:1435779175933:dw|

  13. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    so if your area of a parallelogram is 14, then when dimensions are doubled the area is going to be?

  14. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    (or, are you done with question 1 already?)

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is it 28

  16. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    14 • 4 = ?

  17. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    your area is FOUR times bigger when dimensions are doubled.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    56?

  19. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yes

  20. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Now, your next q. I will put it up again not to scroll up....

  21. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    ` ` For a game, Tony has a rectangle drawn on a piece of paper that has an area of 18 in.2. What should he do to the dimensions in order to have a similar rectangle that's area is only 2 in.2? Divide them by nine. Divide them by six. Divide them by three. Multiply them by three. ` `

  22. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    you mean area of 18 in², and you want to multiply/divide the dimensions by some number, so that the area is only 2 in².

  23. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    so your rectangle has an area of `L•W` In this case, we know that: L • W = 18 but we want that to be 2

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is it C

  25. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    when you multiply the dimensions times this number (call it x), you are multiplying each dimensions by x, so our new equation is going to be (L•x) • (W • x)=2 and we know (L) • (W)=2

  26. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    (L•x) • (W • x)=2 (L•W) • (x • x)=2 (L•W) • (x²)=2 substitue u=L•W u • x²=2 x²=2/u again, we know that L•W=18 (or u=18) x²=2/u x²=2/18 x²=1/9 x=1/3 (we don't consider negative scale factors)

  27. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    So, you would need to multiply times 1/3. And multiplying times 1/3 is same as dividing by 3. Yes, C is correct.

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you:)

  29. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yw (if you want to know how I put up • × ÷ ≈ and all that just let me know. it would work on most sites and word doc)

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