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iGreen

  • one year ago

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  1. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    What are the expected number of flights on time?

  2. acxbox22
    • one year ago
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    use proportions

  3. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Since 84% of the flights in the random sample are on time, we expect the same percentage to be on time in general. 84% means 84 out of 100.

  4. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    Whoa..major lag

  5. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    \(\dfrac{84}{100} = \dfrac{x}{203} \)

  6. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Your fav igreen! XD

  7. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    I came up with .84 * 203 or 170.52

  8. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    That sounds right

  9. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    You can think of the proportion as follows: 84 flights out of 100 are on time just like x flights out of 203 are on time.

  10. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    170.52

  11. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    I was trying to say that before anyone else commented..for some reason I can only make one comment and it glitches and I have to reload..

  12. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Correct. I'd round it off to 171 because I don't know what 0.52 of a flight is.

  13. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    Okay, now it asks: "What is the standard deviation?"

  14. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    Any idea on how to find that? @mathstudent55

  15. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    What about you? @Astrophysics

  16. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Standard deviation is the average difference between any point of data and the mean, been a long time since I did statistics but I'm sure we can figure it out. \[\sigma = \sqrt{\frac{ 1 }{ N }\sum_{i=1}^{N}(x_i-\mu)^2}\]

  17. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    But for this the easiest way I see is we can just use \[\sigma = \sqrt{npq}\] where \[\mu = \sqrt{np}\] that should be easy enough :P

  18. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    Ahhh

  19. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    I got 5.22

  20. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    That sounds good!

  21. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    \(\sf \sqrt{260 \times 0.84 \times 0.16}\)

  22. iGreen
    • one year ago
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    Thanks!

  23. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Np

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