A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

The graph compares the 1s orbital energies for the F atom (Z = 9), the Ne+ ion (Z = 10), and the Na++ ion (Z = 11). a. How many electrons does each species have? b. According to the graph, which species is most stable? c. Use Coulomb's law to explain the energy measurements shown in the graph and how this affects the distribution of electrons.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 Attachment
  2. cuanchi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a) all the species have the same number of electrons. 9 electrons b) I dont understand that graph what its represent. The electron in the 1s are core electron and the energy usually are negative ( are electrons)

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thank you!

  4. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[F = \frac{ kQ _{1}q _{2} }{ r ^{2}}\] To me this is a tough question Above is columbs law which states that the columbia force is inversely proportional to the distance squared. so as the charges get closer together (r)^2 becomes big and your force goes up i think it's by a factor of r^2. as the charges get farther apart in distance the columbic force decreases. the issue here is that we're dealing with the 1s orbital. (the graph is showing us the energies of the 1s orbital) but i've never encountered a question talking about 1s orbital energies b.c usually we deal with valence electrons. I can probably guess/infer that removal of electrons, creates a higher positive charge so the inner electrons most notably the ones in the one s orbital will be held much more tightly once you remove an electron from the outer shell. Now to explain the effect, I would guess that the more electrons you remove the atomic radius (r) decreases and the force of attraction goes up and would (occupy lower energy) don't quote me on that last part I'm not sure. But I don't think this is the same as the amount of energy you would need to put in more energy to remove electrons as that + charge increases. I would guess Fc would be the greatest for Na++ followed by Neon+ and then F. another thing in the graph, I guess we'll base it off of this also *Higher energy implies less stable* Now based off of this i would guess that the most stable would be Na++ followed by Ne+ then F as least stable. (not sure completely) Neon+ Z 9 similar configuration to fluorine Flourine z = 9 Na++ Z = 9 All of these ions have a similar electron configuration to fluorine and thus have 9, electrons.

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    typo** Columb force,

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    also in the first part as the charges get closer as (r)^2 becomes smaller not bigger, and the force increases** sorry was writing that quickly.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thanks again!

  8. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.