A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing


  • one year ago

What does the reader learn about how Macbeth feels regarding Duncan's plans for his son? A. Macbeth and Duncan are great friends and are making plans to combine their fortunes. B. Duncan learns that Macbeth doesn't think Malcolm is worthy of becoming Duncan's heir. C. Macbeth has "black and deep desires" regarding Duncan's son and heir, Malcolm. D. Duncan tells Macbeth that he is going to make Macbeth his heir rather than Malcolm, his son.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Jacob902
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Read the following passage from Macbeth, by William Shakespeare (Act I, scene iv): Dun. My plenteous joys, Wanton in fulness, seek to hide themselves In drops of sorrow. Sons, kinsmen, thanes, And you whose places are the nearest, know We will establish our estate upon Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter The Prince of Cumberland; which honour must Not unaccompanied invest him only, But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine On all deservers. From hence to Inverness, And bind us further to you. Macb. The rest is labour, which is not us'd for you. I'll be myself the harbinger and make joyful The hearing of my wife with your approach; So humbly take my leave. Dun. My worthy Cawdor! Macb. [Aside.] The Prince of Cumberland! That is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires; The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo; he is full so valiant, And in his commendations I am fed; It is a banquet to me. Let's after him, Whose care is gone before to bid us welcome. It is a peerless kinsman. Flourish. Exeunt.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    its either c or d but I'm leaning more towards d as Macbeth flips out and kills everyone but he was also crowned the king due to him being appointed the heir even before he killed the king so most likely D

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    if I'm right can i have a medal :3 I'm new here

  4. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...


  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.