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UnbelievableDreams

  • one year ago

I need help with Chemistry

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  1. UnbelievableDreams
    • one year ago
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    Carbonates react with acids to form a salt, water and carbon dioxide gas. When 58.2 g of calcium carbonate are reacted with sufficient hydrochloric acid, how many grams of calcium chloride will be produced?

  2. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    Start by writing an equation for the reaction and balancing it

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    1 I agree with arronq the first step is to write out your balanced equation ensuring that the number of atoms are the same on both sides of your reaction. 2.Then you find how many moles of the compound you have and multiply that by your molar ratio.

  4. UnbelievableDreams
    • one year ago
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    CaCO3 + 2HCl = CaCl2 + H2O + CO2 Is it correct?

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    That's good

  6. UnbelievableDreams
    • one year ago
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    How do I find the moles?

  7. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    58.2g CaCO3 x (1mol/molar mass g) To figure out the number of mole when given the grams is to take the number of grams and multiply it by 1/(molar mass) of your compound. So you find the molar mass of your compound which is 100 g. so for this compound it means that every mole of this substance has 100grams. Now 58.2g CaCO3 x (1mol/100 g) = mol caco3 So two things. You notice that the grams cancel out because you are multiplying g x (1/g) which cancel out and you're left with moles of CaCO3 The reason why you needed to balance the equation, was that to get how many grams of product you would need to multiply by the molar ratio.

  8. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    So knowing this how would you find the miles of calcium chloride?

  9. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    "Moles""

  10. UnbelievableDreams
    • one year ago
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    So the moles of calcium chloride is 0.582?

  11. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Correct now Look at the molar ratio of CaCl2 to CaCO3 You want to do this because multiplying by the molar ratio will tell you how many mol of a product are produced

  12. UnbelievableDreams
    • one year ago
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    It is 1:1? So the answer is 0.582?

  13. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    0.582 mol CaCO3 x (CaCl2/CaCO3) We're looking for mole of CaCl2 produced, so that's why we multiplied CaCO3 by the molar ratio and you're left with moles of CaCO3 = 0.582 mol CaCl2 x (111g/mol) = grams of CaCl2 So like I said before in your calculations the molar ratio is important because if you set it up correctly your denominators cancel and your left with the unit that you WANT in this case CaCl2. My advice loop up dimensional analysis because it will help you do these types of problems.

  14. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Be careful to always do the math out because your ratio won't always be 1:1

  15. UnbelievableDreams
    • one year ago
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    Now, I understand. I have few questions that I need help.

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Great

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