A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

Movie Preference Action Drama Comedy Row totals High School 400 230 120 750 College 200 510 280 990 Column totals 600 740 400 1740 Julie mistakenly calculated the conditional relative frequency for college students who like comedy as being 70%. What did Julie actually calculate, and what is the correct answer?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    She calculated the joint relative frequency for college/comedy. The correct value of conditional relative frequency for college students who like comedy is 28%. She calculated the conditional relative frequency for comedy films that are liked by college students. The correct value of conditional relative frequency for college students who like comedy is16%. She calculated the conditional relative frequency for comedy films that are liked by college students. The correct answer is 28%. She calculated the joint relative frequency for college/comedy. The correct answer is 16%.

  2. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Which do you believe it is?

  3. nincompoop
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this can be solved without guessing

  4. nincompoop
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If I had 10 marbles, 70% of it would be 7. If I had 40 wives, 50% of it would be 25. Notice that in order to get the value of a certain percentage, the total must be included. So if you had a total sample size of 1000, then 70% of it is 700. But what if I am actually looking at the 300 and not the 7000, then you would know what percentage it is (since per cent pertains to per 100) so 300. This can get more complicated, but it would be easy if you know how to solve it. \(\huge \frac{700}{1000} \times 100 \rightarrow \frac{group ~ of~ people~to~count}{total }\times 100\)

  5. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.