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anonymous

  • one year ago

Imagine a population of N = 4 individuals, A, B, C and D. Individuals A and B are planning to vote in favor of a controversial referendum, whereas individuals C and D are planning to vote no. In the foreground of the referendum, you are asked to conduct a poll of n=2 individuals. Considering all conceivable simple random samples without replacement, what is the range in the estimates of the percentage of people who support the referendum?

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  1. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    Suppose your sample is \(\large \{C, D\}\) They gonna say no, so the percentage in favor is \(0\%\)

  2. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    That is one extreme, can you guess the other extreme ?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A,B Say yes, so percent in favor is 100%... but not sure how to apply this to this question!

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    N=2 individuals would be AB, AC, AD, BC, BD and CD without replacement

  5. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    so minimum = 0 maximum = 100 range = ?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    100%?

  7. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    i think so, if by range they mean max-min

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes, i think they mean that.. Just wasn't sure how they meant it with their wording... but thanks!

  9. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    looks good then

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What if it were for 3 individuals?

  11. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    you mean the sample contains 3 individuals, n = 3 ?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  13. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    just work worst case and best case

  14. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    worst case : 2 no, 1 yes best case : 1 no, 2 yes

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is it 50% and 50%?

  16. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    nope, how did u get 50% ?

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh wait.... sorry

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    first is 33% 2 = no 1 = yes, so

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    or am I off...

  20. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    looks good!

  21. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    33.33%

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and second is 66 %

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so it's 33.33% the answer

  24. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    Looks good!

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks a bunch!

  26. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    let us understand the key terms: sample size, n without replacement

  27. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    Sample size would be the randomized people in the population being considered. You must realize that sometimes a population is too big that it would not be feasible to include them all in the study so instead we select random people that would best represent a whole population, but if it is small, then it is much easier. If we want to do a statistical analysis, for example, of a population that is for gun control and against. Say, there are 4 total voters representing of equal number between Republicans and Democrats. Republicans like their guns and Democrats like to control the ownership. Since our population, n, is so small that we can include them all in our list. They can be grouped accordingly, but at the same time, we can also randomize (assign numbers) them. \(Voters: 1, 2, 3, 4 \) where Republican: 1, 3 Democrat: 2, 4 But in our analysis we only want people that are against the gun control. So, we can immediately tell that we now have a smaller group of people {1, 3}, n = 2. Now here's the other term, WITHOUT REPLACEMENT what this means is that if I randomly selected my first selection out 1 and 3, I cannot put the number back into the selection. Meaning if I picked 3, then there is only 1 left to be picked next. If it says WITH REPLACEMENT, after I picked 3, then I put 3 back into the group to be selected and there's a chance that I might pick it again the next round of selection or not.

  28. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    http://studyzone.org/mtestprep/math8/g/probwithless.cfm

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