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Saylilbaby

  • one year ago

what are the shifts for the graph of (x)=1/x+5-4?

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  1. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    @Astrophysics @TheSmartOne

  2. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Do you mean \[f(x) = \frac{ 1 }{ x }+1\]

  3. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Your question isn't clear to me

  4. TheSmartOne
    • one year ago
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    or maybe: \[f(x) = \frac{ 1 }{ x+5 }-1\]

  5. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    OOOOOH

  6. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Well the (x+5) would tell you it's a horizontal shift in the left axis, and the -1 would be vertical units, can you figure out if it's up or down? Note the graph of f(x) = 1/x looks as such |dw:1436144361958:dw| it's asymptotic

  7. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    \[(x)=\frac{ 1 }{ x+5 }-4\] @Astrophysics @TheSmartOne

  8. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    -1, -4 what ever, same thing applies as I mentioned above, me saying +1 may have confused TSO for the slight second there haha as I did 5-4. :)

  9. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    lol so the shiftsare -1,-4 @Astrophysics

  10. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    No there's a vertical shift down by 4 units.

  11. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    so the answer is "there is a verticle shift down by 4"? @Astrophysics

  12. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    This is how your graph should look, with the shifts I've mentioned above, via https://www.desmos.com/calculator |dw:1436145206647:dw|

  13. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    There is also a horizontal shift of (x+5) units to the left.

  14. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    1/(x+5)*

  15. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    ok so what I do next? @Astrophysics

  16. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    That's it, those are the shifts of your equation.

  17. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    the shifts are -1,-4 and (x+5) @Astrophysics

  18. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Where is the -1 coming from?

  19. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    idk im confused... so its -4 and (x+5)? @Astrophysics

  20. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Well you can put that if you want, but I wouldn't if I didn't understand it, the original graph is |dw:1436145764598:dw| now we add to it, which makes the shifts

  21. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436145781683:dw|

  22. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Then we do a shift of 1/(x+5) which gives |dw:1436145894326:dw|

  23. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    It's a bit messy just try plugging in all the shifts yourself on this site, and I think you will understand it: https://www.desmos.com/calculator

  24. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    @DecentNabeel

  25. saylilbaby
    • one year ago
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    @chealseaa_grinn

  26. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    What else do you need help with @Saylilbaby

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