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Mindblast3r

  • one year ago

help.

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  1. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    @Mizuki

  2. Mizuki
    • one year ago
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    hi again

  3. Mizuki
    • one year ago
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    wat do u need help with??

  4. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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  5. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    i understand everything except the red circle part.

  6. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    oh yay astrophysics to the rescue <3

  7. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    It's a property that tells us this \[\huge \frac{ a }{ \frac{ b }{ c } } = \frac{ c \times a }{ b }\]

  8. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    So think of it this way, |dw:1436161113139:dw| it's just dividing by fractions really

  9. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Remember when you divide fractions, you take the second fraction, flip and multiply

  10. Mizuki
    • one year ago
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    that's wat i thought

  11. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    nono i know this already.

  12. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    what i'm asking is, shouldn't the entire part be,

  13. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{ 10 }{ \tan(<BAC) }=\frac{ 10 }{ 9 }\]

  14. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    No because \[\tan(< BAC) = \frac{ 10 }{ 9 }\]

  15. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    why is it like, how it's posted in the example.

  16. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    my way leads to the answer being 9 though?

  17. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436161397822:dw|

  18. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    ohhh i get it!

  19. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    wait i get it a little!

  20. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    You're just plugging 10/9 for for that expression, that's all

  21. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436161457997:dw|

  22. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes :)

  23. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    what is that 10 then?

  24. Mizuki
    • one year ago
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    the 10 on the top of 10/tan(<BAC)

  25. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    you understand everything mizuki?

  26. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    BC = 10, because what you're solving for is AC, |dw:1436161552377:dw|

  27. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    can't it be like this though,

  28. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    sec

  29. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    BC = 10

  30. Mizuki
    • one year ago
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    yes i do understand everything @Mindblast3r

  31. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436161657752:dw|

  32. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    No, because you're saying that tan(<BAC) = 9 then

  33. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    But it actually = 10/9

  34. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    the 10 in the numerator represents BC

  35. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    ohhh and 10/9 is a ratio right?

  36. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes, that the tan ratio

  37. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    and you use that ratio to solve for the missing side (adjacent).

  38. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    correct?

  39. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes, because they told you that tan(<BAC) = 10/9 (for the angle of triangle)

  40. Mizuki
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436161889108:dw|

  41. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    ohhh!!

  42. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    But what you're looking for is the side AC

  43. Mizuki
    • one year ago
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    get it now??

  44. mindblast3r
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436162002962:dw|

  45. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Awesome :)

  46. Mizuki
    • one year ago
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    great!! :)

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