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anonymous

  • one year ago

A flagpole 4 m tall stands on a sloping roof. A support wire 5 m long joins the top of the pole to a point on the roof 6 m up from the bottom of the pole. At what angle is the roof inclined to the horizontal?

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  1. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    draw it out

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i've tried but i really have no idea what it's saying

  3. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    It is a bit ambiguous but lets try and make sense of it whatever we can, start by drawing a roof

  4. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436236697787:dw|

  5. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436236736659:dw|

  6. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436236818328:dw|

  7. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    does that make sense or do you think we are off

  8. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436237277123:dw|

  9. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    I am a bit confused by the problem. It says there is a 4m pole on top of a roof. Then it says a wire joins the top of a support wire 5m long joins the top of the pole to a point on the roof 6m up from the bottom of the pole. That is where I get confused...

  10. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    poorly phrased question haha

  11. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    Sure is aha

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sorry my internet cut out let me work thorough what y'all just posted

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hmm ok so using @ganeshie8 drawing |dw:1436237283112:dw| (sorry about my terrible digital art :P) would i be solving for that angle?

  14. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    I don't think that's how I saw it ...

  15. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436238040201:dw|

  16. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    nice home

  17. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    ROFL thanks!!!

  18. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    All in all its still not making any sense =/

  19. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436238176817:dw|

  20. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    They want that angle, I think

  21. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    The way the problem is set up, it looks like the creator was expecting you to use Law of Cosines

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok those drawings make sense..but what do i plug into the law of cosines to find the roof angle?

  23. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436239234310:dw|

  24. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    So this is what I'm seeing here: a point on the roof 6m "up" from the bottom of the pole can mean two things.. it can mean the triangle you showed me with the angle between 4 and 6 |dw:1436239558073:dw| or it can be interpreted as the picture I just drawn - the point is 6m up vertically Which makes the problem harder to solve, of course, but easy doesn't always mean correct. The triangle you presented to me will probably be what most students are going to try. in the case of the first triangle remember that the law of Cosines is: c^2 = a^2 + b^2 - 2ab cos C so in the first triangle, which is what many people will try the side opposite to the angle you are trying to solve for is c and the other two sides are a and b using the law of Cosines, you should be able to solve for the angle Θ, which is "C"

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok thank you! i have to go right now but i'll work it out. thanks so much

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