Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
I need help on all of these problems, sometimes using this website: http://phet.colorado.edu/sims/vector-addition/vector-addition_en.html. The questions are attached below. @zepdrix
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
For the first few questions.
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
https://www.mathsisfun.com/algebra/vectors.html
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
https://www.khanacademy.org/math/precalculus/vectors-precalc

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Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/vectors/Lesson-1/Vectors-and-Direction
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
Maybe, those will help^^
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
it didn't
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
1 Attachment
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
attempt at #7
1 Attachment
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
sry, :(
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
link is broken :(
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
@zepdrix http://phet.colorado.edu/sims/vector-addition/vector-addition_en.html
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
so uhhhh which one you up to right now? 0_o by the way, i would recommend using `style 2`, that one makes the most sense.
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
@zepdrix I did #1, that's as far as I got. Everything else I attempted but didn't work
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Ok let's use trig to explain problem 2, as they have requested. If the `x component` is `twice the size` of the `y component` we can write that relationship like this: \(\large\rm x=2y\)
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
does that solve it?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Mmm that's the right idea, yes! But they want this generalized for ANY vector. You showed that it works for a specific set of lengths, 11 and 22.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
So what we would rather do is call our \(\large\rm \color{orangered}{x=2y}\) and our \(\large\rm y=y\) x is twice the length of y, that's how we got that relationship. So again plug this into your inverse tangent.\[\large\rm \tan^{-1}\left(\frac{y}{\color{orangered}{x}}\right)=\tan^{-1}\left(\frac{y}{\color{orangered}{2y}}\right)\]
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Do you see where this is going? :)
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
yes, I understand what you are implying
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
11 divided by 22 can be simplified to 1/2. The same thing will happen with our setup here! We can cancel the y's and see that the argument simplifies to 1/2. Again, you'll get 26.6 degrees, but now we've generalized it. yay team
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
okay, haha, yes I understand, now on to the next one :)
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
mmmm number 3 should be pretty straight forward.
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
but what would it look like?
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
like this?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
if i have some vector V and then I add to that some vector -V, they'll give me 0, ya? So draw a vector going off in some direction. And draw another vector going in the opposite direction. Illustrated here as an example:|dw:1436388162556:dw|
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Yah I think yours will work also. But it'll be easier to setup if both tails start from the origin.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
i mean, if both tails are touching.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
i dont really understand how to use the `show sum` tool. trying to figure that out...
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
oh oh ok i get it now
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
actually, your example was fine, ya just go with that :) neeeeext
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
On your picture that you posted, if you click the "show sum" button, you should notice that nothing happens. That's because the sum is zero, so there is nothing to display
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
so my example works or no?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
ya
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
okay cool. next
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
4 is the same idea... this should be pretty straight forward. We just showed that we can add two vectors to get zero. So now we want to add three vectors and end up with only the first one...... meaning that `the other two vectors added to zero`. ya? ;o
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
when I try to press the show sum button it doesnt come up
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
no, I dont really get 4 either
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
|dw:1436388637712:dw|So for problem 3, we did something like this. Two vectors added together, gave us nothing, zero.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
|dw:1436388727454:dw|
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Now for this next part, we want to add 3 vectors together. A+B+C and end up with only A.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
So we could draw A ..... anywhere else.|dw:1436388787394:dw|
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
If they want us to "describe it" though, instead of graphing it... let's umm.... Let's just say that vector C is the negative of vector B.
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
okay.....
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
\(\large\rm \color{orangered}{\vec C=-\vec B}\) Therefore adding some vectors A, B and C: \(\large\rm \vec A+\vec B+\color{orangered}{\vec C}=?\)
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Can you fill in the blank? :)
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
A?
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
That is how I would describe it?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Well, don't forget the middle step though.\[\large\rm \vec A+\vec B+\color{orangered}{\vec C}=\vec A+\vec B+\color{orangered}{-\vec B}\]Which yes, you can go a little further and say,\[\large\rm =\vec A+\vec 0=\vec A\]Because B and -B cancel out.
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
oh okay, that makes sense
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
how bout 5, figure that one out? :d comeonnnn that one is eassyyyy :D
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
no......?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
you `could` get all fancy and try to make the y's add up to zero. That seems tedious though. let's just make it really easy on ourselves and draw horizontal lines. Example: Let's say I want three vectors to add up to `20 in the x direction` `0 in the y direction`. Well I could do something like this:|dw:1436389431399:dw|\[\large\rm \vec A+\color{royalblue}{\vec B}+\vec C=5x+0y+\color{royalblue}{5x+0y}+10x+0y\]\[\large\rm =20x+0y\]
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
i gotta go :3 i be back later maybe
Summersnow8
  • Summersnow8
okay, thanks for the help so far

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